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Seeking Emancipation through Engagement: One Nichiren Buddhistis Approach to Practice

Seeking Emancipation through Engagement: One Nichiren Buddhistis Approach to Practice DUAL BELONGING / PERSONAL JOURNEYS Seeking Emancipation through Engagement: One Nichiren Buddhist's Approach to Practice Bill Aiken SGI­USA I was born and raised Roman Catholic, which meant attending Catholic schools, first in the local parish schools and later at a private academy in suburban Philadelphia. As a child I was serious about my religion. I served as an altar boy and had serious thoughts about becoming a priest. That was until the mid-1960s, when my hormones took over, my voice changed, and I converted to hedonism. I hadn't so much turned against my Catholic upbringing as I was temporarily distracted from it. It was when I went away to college that the religious questions began to resurface. Friends and classmates wanted to know what I believed in, and I really didn't know. The old form of Catholicism, with its stern, patriarchal vision of God, didn't seem to fit anymore. But the mystery remained as a palpable presence, and it seemed to require an answer. Was I an atheist? That seemed so negative. How about an agnostic? Possibly. They seemed to believe in something, even if they didn't know what it was. That seemed about right for the moment. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Buddhist-Christian Studies University of Hawai'I Press

Seeking Emancipation through Engagement: One Nichiren Buddhistis Approach to Practice

Buddhist-Christian Studies , Volume 23 (1) – Oct 29, 2003

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 The University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9472
Publisher site
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Abstract

DUAL BELONGING / PERSONAL JOURNEYS Seeking Emancipation through Engagement: One Nichiren Buddhist's Approach to Practice Bill Aiken SGI­USA I was born and raised Roman Catholic, which meant attending Catholic schools, first in the local parish schools and later at a private academy in suburban Philadelphia. As a child I was serious about my religion. I served as an altar boy and had serious thoughts about becoming a priest. That was until the mid-1960s, when my hormones took over, my voice changed, and I converted to hedonism. I hadn't so much turned against my Catholic upbringing as I was temporarily distracted from it. It was when I went away to college that the religious questions began to resurface. Friends and classmates wanted to know what I believed in, and I really didn't know. The old form of Catholicism, with its stern, patriarchal vision of God, didn't seem to fit anymore. But the mystery remained as a palpable presence, and it seemed to require an answer. Was I an atheist? That seemed so negative. How about an agnostic? Possibly. They seemed to believe in something, even if they didn't know what it was. That seemed about right for the moment.

Journal

Buddhist-Christian StudiesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Oct 29, 2003

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