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Secret Science: Spanish Cosmography and the New World by María M. Portuondo (review)

Secret Science: Spanish Cosmography and the New World by María M. Portuondo (review) journal of world history, december 2012 pay taxes to central elites, including temples and shrines. This new economic pattern was solidified after the court tried to overthrow the bakufu in 1221, and, consequently, the bakufu began to encroach on the court's traditional role as arbiter of economic policy by arrogating to itself a larger role in tax policy as well as foreign trade. This process was only hastened in the Muromachi period when the bakufu began essentially issuing debt relief edicts to retainers in exchange for a fee, perhaps because the Ashikaga family controlled far less land than theMinamotoortheHjandhadamuchlesssecuregriponlocal warriors. Segal notes that his research raises a number of questions that go unanswered in his book but would make for fruitful future studies. Who, for example, were the merchants who facilitated the import of Chinese currency into Japan in the medieval period? One tantalizing suggestion is that perhaps a significant amount of coinage made its way across the sea not in officially sponsored ships but in private ships such as those operated by the wak. These are questions that are tangential to Segal's main concern and should in no way detract from the masterful use of Japanese sources http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of World History University of Hawai'I Press

Secret Science: Spanish Cosmography and the New World by María M. Portuondo (review)

Journal of World History , Volume 23 (4) – May 24, 2012

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-8050
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Abstract

journal of world history, december 2012 pay taxes to central elites, including temples and shrines. This new economic pattern was solidified after the court tried to overthrow the bakufu in 1221, and, consequently, the bakufu began to encroach on the court's traditional role as arbiter of economic policy by arrogating to itself a larger role in tax policy as well as foreign trade. This process was only hastened in the Muromachi period when the bakufu began essentially issuing debt relief edicts to retainers in exchange for a fee, perhaps because the Ashikaga family controlled far less land than theMinamotoortheHjandhadamuchlesssecuregriponlocal warriors. Segal notes that his research raises a number of questions that go unanswered in his book but would make for fruitful future studies. Who, for example, were the merchants who facilitated the import of Chinese currency into Japan in the medieval period? One tantalizing suggestion is that perhaps a significant amount of coinage made its way across the sea not in officially sponsored ships but in private ships such as those operated by the wak. These are questions that are tangential to Segal's main concern and should in no way detract from the masterful use of Japanese sources

Journal

Journal of World HistoryUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: May 24, 2012

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