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Sati and the Task of the Historian

Sati and the Task of the Historian The article's approach to sati and similar phenomena is functionally and morally neutral. A society that practices following in death is not, for that matter, considered inferior. Schneewind, however, pleads for a normative moral approach, ranking societies according to their ability to rid themselves of harmful customs. What in the article is shown as a mere functional difference between European (or Christian) and (some) non-Western societies thereby appears as an illegitimate Eurocentrism or ethnocentrism. Such a view should not be read into the text, as it will inhibit consideration of important questions. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of World History University of Hawai'I Press

Sati and the Task of the Historian

Journal of World History , Volume 18 (3) – Nov 7, 2007

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 by University of Hawai'i Press. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1527-8050
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The article's approach to sati and similar phenomena is functionally and morally neutral. A society that practices following in death is not, for that matter, considered inferior. Schneewind, however, pleads for a normative moral approach, ranking societies according to their ability to rid themselves of harmful customs. What in the article is shown as a mere functional difference between European (or Christian) and (some) non-Western societies thereby appears as an illegitimate Eurocentrism or ethnocentrism. Such a view should not be read into the text, as it will inhibit consideration of important questions.

Journal

Journal of World HistoryUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Nov 7, 2007

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