Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Santayana and Buddhism: The Choice between the Cross and the Bo Tree

Santayana and Buddhism: The Choice between the Cross and the Bo Tree ESSAYS Santayana and Buddhism: The Choice between the Cross and the Bo Tree Paul Grimley Kuntz Emory University Santayana honors Gotama Buddha as a profound religious genius as well as an orig- inal philosopher. Gotama’s way is genuine spiritual wisdom, and constantly com- pared with Christian mysticism as a way of enlightenment. It is therefore understand- able that a Spaniard, who learned his catechism in Ávila, and who was educated in the New England of Emerson and other Transcendentalists who honored Oriental wisdom, should have so much to say about the Buddha and Buddhism. The effort of this paper is to gather many of the isolated passages to give a coher- ent picture of Santayana and Buddhism. One difficulty to be overcome is that the philosopher rarely quotes his sources (the exception is a single quotation from Das- gupta). Although Santayana has numerous opinions, he does not reveal on which translations he has relied. Nor does he contrast different traditions of Buddhists. To overcome the vagueness of scholarship, I have used the volumes found in Widener Library: the sorts of books known to Santayana’s dissertation director, Josiah Royce, and those of a sympathetic sort that had led Santayana as http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Buddhist-Christian Studies University of Hawai'I Press

Santayana and Buddhism: The Choice between the Cross and the Bo Tree

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-hawai-i-press/santayana-and-buddhism-the-choice-between-the-cross-and-the-bo-tree-ug0LZH9ELV
Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 The University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9472

Abstract

ESSAYS Santayana and Buddhism: The Choice between the Cross and the Bo Tree Paul Grimley Kuntz Emory University Santayana honors Gotama Buddha as a profound religious genius as well as an orig- inal philosopher. Gotama’s way is genuine spiritual wisdom, and constantly com- pared with Christian mysticism as a way of enlightenment. It is therefore understand- able that a Spaniard, who learned his catechism in Ávila, and who was educated in the New England of Emerson and other Transcendentalists who honored Oriental wisdom, should have so much to say about the Buddha and Buddhism. The effort of this paper is to gather many of the isolated passages to give a coher- ent picture of Santayana and Buddhism. One difficulty to be overcome is that the philosopher rarely quotes his sources (the exception is a single quotation from Das- gupta). Although Santayana has numerous opinions, he does not reveal on which translations he has relied. Nor does he contrast different traditions of Buddhists. To overcome the vagueness of scholarship, I have used the volumes found in Widener Library: the sorts of books known to Santayana’s dissertation director, Josiah Royce, and those of a sympathetic sort that had led Santayana as

Journal

Buddhist-Christian StudiesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jan 1, 2001

There are no references for this article.