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Sacred Display: Divine and Magical Female Figures of Eurasia (review)

Sacred Display: Divine and Magical Female Figures of Eurasia (review) Book Reviews the limitations that the editor placed on the contributors, the quality of individual essays in this collection is generally good. They represent a careful analysis of interstate politics in a particular place and at a given moment. However, one wonders why some essays were even included and then placed in an impossible editorial frame. Why Russia? Why China? Kagan is a classical scholar, and therefore most of her examples of power politics come from ancient Greece and Rome. It seems to me that Russia and China were included to give the book a more world-historical focus. If this was the case, then the editor has failed. This is not world history but more of what I would call a Grand Tour kind of history, a bit of classical antiquity and then back to dear old Anglo-American Blighty. However, this was not what we were promised in the beginning of the book. In the beginning, Kagan stated that her methodology was inductive: the historical examples first, historical pattern later. She would take a look at imperial moments in history, analyze them in terms of power politics and interstate relations, and, if possible, find the pattern that could http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of World History University of Hawai'I Press

Sacred Display: Divine and Magical Female Figures of Eurasia (review)

Journal of World History , Volume 22 (4) – Nov 25, 2011

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Hawai'I Press
ISSN
1527-8050
Publisher site
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Abstract

Book Reviews the limitations that the editor placed on the contributors, the quality of individual essays in this collection is generally good. They represent a careful analysis of interstate politics in a particular place and at a given moment. However, one wonders why some essays were even included and then placed in an impossible editorial frame. Why Russia? Why China? Kagan is a classical scholar, and therefore most of her examples of power politics come from ancient Greece and Rome. It seems to me that Russia and China were included to give the book a more world-historical focus. If this was the case, then the editor has failed. This is not world history but more of what I would call a Grand Tour kind of history, a bit of classical antiquity and then back to dear old Anglo-American Blighty. However, this was not what we were promised in the beginning of the book. In the beginning, Kagan stated that her methodology was inductive: the historical examples first, historical pattern later. She would take a look at imperial moments in history, analyze them in terms of power politics and interstate relations, and, if possible, find the pattern that could

Journal

Journal of World HistoryUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Nov 25, 2011

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