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Rorty, Pragmatism, and Confucianism: With Responses by Richard Rorty (review)

Rorty, Pragmatism, and Confucianism: With Responses by Richard Rorty (review) de- and repoliticized since the end of the Cultural Revolution. Strauss and Hockx explain that the volume begins and ends with pieces on "the production and consumption of culture in general," though the articles to which they refer specifically address the buying and selling of lifestyles and consumer goods (p. 1). It is not that the editors are mistaken in identifying culture with consumption, rock music, or poetry; rather, the issue is that they never explain these identifications in the first place. Further, several articles in this volume compellingly discuss China as an internally variegated and rapidly changing entity, but invoke the West as if this category were stable and self-evident. Maghiel van Crevel productively describes "the West" as an "ineradicable generalization" (p. 124). But how has the content of this generalization also changed in recent years? Isn't its durability due at least in part to its continued reiteration by academics? Maggie Clinton Maggie Clinton is an assistant professor of history at Middlebury College. Yong Huang, editor. Rorty, Pragmatism, and Confucianism: With Responses by Richard Rorty. Albany: State University of New York Press, 2009. 332 pp. Hardcover $85.00, isbn 978-0-7914-7683-3. Paperback $26.95, isbn 978-0-7914-7684-0. Presumably, Richard Rorty's brand http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png China Review International University of Hawai'I Press

Rorty, Pragmatism, and Confucianism: With Responses by Richard Rorty (review)

China Review International , Volume 16 (2) – Oct 31, 2009

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University of Hawai'I Press
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Copyright © University of Hawai'I Press
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1527-9367
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Abstract

de- and repoliticized since the end of the Cultural Revolution. Strauss and Hockx explain that the volume begins and ends with pieces on "the production and consumption of culture in general," though the articles to which they refer specifically address the buying and selling of lifestyles and consumer goods (p. 1). It is not that the editors are mistaken in identifying culture with consumption, rock music, or poetry; rather, the issue is that they never explain these identifications in the first place. Further, several articles in this volume compellingly discuss China as an internally variegated and rapidly changing entity, but invoke the West as if this category were stable and self-evident. Maghiel van Crevel productively describes "the West" as an "ineradicable generalization" (p. 124). But how has the content of this generalization also changed in recent years? Isn't its durability due at least in part to its continued reiteration by academics? Maggie Clinton Maggie Clinton is an assistant professor of history at Middlebury College. Yong Huang, editor. Rorty, Pragmatism, and Confucianism: With Responses by Richard Rorty. Albany: State University of New York Press, 2009. 332 pp. Hardcover $85.00, isbn 978-0-7914-7683-3. Paperback $26.95, isbn 978-0-7914-7684-0. Presumably, Richard Rorty's brand

Journal

China Review InternationalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Oct 31, 2009

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