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Rising Life Expectancy: A Global History (review)

Rising Life Expectancy: A Global History (review) Book Reviews slavery. They will be useful in senior undergraduate and graduate seminars. Among other things, the editors' introductions provide an opportunity for professors and their students to debate how scholars handle historical evidence. joseph e. inikori University of Rochester Rising Life Expectancy: A Global History. By james c. riley. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2001. 256 pp. $50.00 (cloth); $18.00 (paper). James C. Riley, Distinguished Professor of History at Indiana University (Bloomington), has recast himself as a historical demographer whose body of work incorporates an interdisciplinary approach to the history of morbidity and mortality. His latest work, Rising Life Expectancy: A Global History, focuses on the global democratization of the expectation of long life (p. 221). Riley examines this "health transition" beginning (somewhat arbitrarily) at 1800 and extending to the present day. The global health transition has emerged from the health transitions of individual countries whose pursuit of longer life expectancies have taken divergent paths. Riley identifies six tactical areas for the reduction of mortality: public health, medicine, wealth and income, nutrition, behavior, and education (p. x). Extending life expectancy is a process that incorporates all six of these components to a greater or lesser degree. Rising http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of World History University of Hawai'I Press

Rising Life Expectancy: A Global History (review)

Journal of World History , Volume 14 (4) – Oct 12, 2003

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 by University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-8050
Publisher site
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Abstract

Book Reviews slavery. They will be useful in senior undergraduate and graduate seminars. Among other things, the editors' introductions provide an opportunity for professors and their students to debate how scholars handle historical evidence. joseph e. inikori University of Rochester Rising Life Expectancy: A Global History. By james c. riley. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2001. 256 pp. $50.00 (cloth); $18.00 (paper). James C. Riley, Distinguished Professor of History at Indiana University (Bloomington), has recast himself as a historical demographer whose body of work incorporates an interdisciplinary approach to the history of morbidity and mortality. His latest work, Rising Life Expectancy: A Global History, focuses on the global democratization of the expectation of long life (p. 221). Riley examines this "health transition" beginning (somewhat arbitrarily) at 1800 and extending to the present day. The global health transition has emerged from the health transitions of individual countries whose pursuit of longer life expectancies have taken divergent paths. Riley identifies six tactical areas for the reduction of mortality: public health, medicine, wealth and income, nutrition, behavior, and education (p. x). Extending life expectancy is a process that incorporates all six of these components to a greater or lesser degree. Rising

Journal

Journal of World HistoryUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Oct 12, 2003

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