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Rise and Demise: Comparing World-Systems (review)

Rise and Demise: Comparing World-Systems (review) Book Reviews Rise and Demise: Comparing World Systems. By christopher chase-dunn and thomas d. hall. Boulder: Westview Press, 1997. Pp. xi + 322. $25.00 (paper). This volume is a contribution to the conversation that has devel- oped among historians and social scientists since the publication of Immanuel Wallerstein’s The Modern World System (3 volumes, 1974– 89). Wallerstein showed how the process of capitalist develop- ment in Europe created imbalances between central “core” and exter- nal “peripheral” areas as the latter were hooked into the expanding capitalist market “system.” Over the last decade, Wallerstein’s “world-systems theory” has been criticized for ignoring the importance of economic activity outside and “before Europe.” Janet Abu-Lughod proposed a pre-1500 world system from 1250 –1350 and André Gunder Frank and Barry K. Gills argued for a single Eurasian world system continuing over five thousand years. Debates have raged over the continuity of early and modern systems, the number, unity, plurality, or polarity of systems, the meaning (and, thus, the spelling) of “world[-]system[s],” and the relationship of a world system to capitalism. Christopher Chase-Dunn and Thomas Hall summarize these debates and develop their own positions in the course of a dozen chap- ters, both theoretical and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of World History University of Hawai'I Press

Rise and Demise: Comparing World-Systems (review)

Journal of World History , Volume 11 (2) – Oct 1, 2001

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-8050

Abstract

Book Reviews Rise and Demise: Comparing World Systems. By christopher chase-dunn and thomas d. hall. Boulder: Westview Press, 1997. Pp. xi + 322. $25.00 (paper). This volume is a contribution to the conversation that has devel- oped among historians and social scientists since the publication of Immanuel Wallerstein’s The Modern World System (3 volumes, 1974– 89). Wallerstein showed how the process of capitalist develop- ment in Europe created imbalances between central “core” and exter- nal “peripheral” areas as the latter were hooked into the expanding capitalist market “system.” Over the last decade, Wallerstein’s “world-systems theory” has been criticized for ignoring the importance of economic activity outside and “before Europe.” Janet Abu-Lughod proposed a pre-1500 world system from 1250 –1350 and André Gunder Frank and Barry K. Gills argued for a single Eurasian world system continuing over five thousand years. Debates have raged over the continuity of early and modern systems, the number, unity, plurality, or polarity of systems, the meaning (and, thus, the spelling) of “world[-]system[s],” and the relationship of a world system to capitalism. Christopher Chase-Dunn and Thomas Hall summarize these debates and develop their own positions in the course of a dozen chap- ters, both theoretical and

Journal

Journal of World HistoryUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Oct 1, 2001

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