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Rhythmic Tendencies in the Choreographies of Dairakudakan's Muramatsu Takuya

Rhythmic Tendencies in the Choreographies of Dairakudakan's Muramatsu Takuya <p>Abstract:</p><p>This article examines rhythm in the choreographies of Dairakudakan&apos;s Muramatsu Takuya using concepts from Henri Lefebvre&apos;s rhythmanalysis as a framework. Works analyzed include <i>Dobu</i> (Ditch, 2007), <i>Sonna Tokikoso Warattero</i> (To Laugh at Such a Time, 2008), <i>Ana</i> (Hole, 2009), and <i>Wasureru, Omoidase</i> (Forget, Remember, 2013). The article discusses how rhythm informs overriding themes, performer training, scenographic design, scene transitions, and contrasts between solo and group performance in each piece. Key concepts from Lefebvre&apos;s theory used to interpret Muramatsu&apos;s work include polyrhythmia, eurhythmia/arrhythmia, dressage, and secret rhythms. In comparing multiple performances, rhythmic similarities emerge in Muramatsu&apos;s oeuvre, such as a common rhythmic arc shaping each piece and similar choreographic strategies employed in order to maximize dramatic effects for an audience, often defined through their use of contrast.</p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Asian Theatre Journal University of Hawai'I Press

Rhythmic Tendencies in the Choreographies of Dairakudakan&apos;s Muramatsu Takuya

Asian Theatre Journal , Volume 37 (2) – Oct 13, 2020

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © The University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-2109

Abstract

<p>Abstract:</p><p>This article examines rhythm in the choreographies of Dairakudakan&apos;s Muramatsu Takuya using concepts from Henri Lefebvre&apos;s rhythmanalysis as a framework. Works analyzed include <i>Dobu</i> (Ditch, 2007), <i>Sonna Tokikoso Warattero</i> (To Laugh at Such a Time, 2008), <i>Ana</i> (Hole, 2009), and <i>Wasureru, Omoidase</i> (Forget, Remember, 2013). The article discusses how rhythm informs overriding themes, performer training, scenographic design, scene transitions, and contrasts between solo and group performance in each piece. Key concepts from Lefebvre&apos;s theory used to interpret Muramatsu&apos;s work include polyrhythmia, eurhythmia/arrhythmia, dressage, and secret rhythms. In comparing multiple performances, rhythmic similarities emerge in Muramatsu&apos;s oeuvre, such as a common rhythmic arc shaping each piece and similar choreographic strategies employed in order to maximize dramatic effects for an audience, often defined through their use of contrast.</p>

Journal

Asian Theatre JournalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Oct 13, 2020

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