Revolutionary Negotiations: Indians, Empires, and Diplomats in the Founding of America (review)

Revolutionary Negotiations: Indians, Empires, and Diplomats in the Founding of America (review) journal of world history, september 2011 torical invitation is followed by a systematic exploration of Tupí society, including its social organization, un-self-conscious nudity, bodily adornment, material culture, and cannibalism. Abulafia's scholarship is precise, impeccable, and sympathetic, though never sentimental. Of course it cannot help but rely on materials generated by Portuguese writers, such as a letter by Caminha. How such sources are handled contributes to both the author's intellectual control and an admirable transparency. Abulafia encourages readers to share his sense of wonder by pointing out, for instance, that the letter "was written in sections, day by day most probably; and it is all the more precious for recording such fresh reactions" (p. 271). This book has no competitor and no equal, a rather remarkable statement about a history of the age of European expansion, but one warranted by its sophistication, comprehensiveness, and elegance. It is, quite simply, a beautifully written piece of history, at once deeply humane, learned, and fresh. The origins of the Atlantic world will never look quite the same. w. jeffrey bolster University of New Hampshire Revolutionary Negotiations: Indians, Empires, and Diplomats in the Founding of America. By leonard j. sadosky. Charlottesville: University of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of World History University of Hawai'I Press

Revolutionary Negotiations: Indians, Empires, and Diplomats in the Founding of America (review)

Journal of World History, Volume 22 (3) – Sep 4, 2011

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Hawai'I Press
ISSN
1527-8050
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Abstract

journal of world history, september 2011 torical invitation is followed by a systematic exploration of Tupí society, including its social organization, un-self-conscious nudity, bodily adornment, material culture, and cannibalism. Abulafia's scholarship is precise, impeccable, and sympathetic, though never sentimental. Of course it cannot help but rely on materials generated by Portuguese writers, such as a letter by Caminha. How such sources are handled contributes to both the author's intellectual control and an admirable transparency. Abulafia encourages readers to share his sense of wonder by pointing out, for instance, that the letter "was written in sections, day by day most probably; and it is all the more precious for recording such fresh reactions" (p. 271). This book has no competitor and no equal, a rather remarkable statement about a history of the age of European expansion, but one warranted by its sophistication, comprehensiveness, and elegance. It is, quite simply, a beautifully written piece of history, at once deeply humane, learned, and fresh. The origins of the Atlantic world will never look quite the same. w. jeffrey bolster University of New Hampshire Revolutionary Negotiations: Indians, Empires, and Diplomats in the Founding of America. By leonard j. sadosky. Charlottesville: University of

Journal

Journal of World HistoryUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Sep 4, 2011

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