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Revolution and Its Narratives: China's Socialist Literary and Cultural Imaginaries, 1949–1966 by Cai Xiang (review)

Revolution and Its Narratives: China's Socialist Literary and Cultural Imaginaries,... Reviews 151 of China was as continuously and as profoundly affected as the southwest in general and Sichuan in particular. If one were simply to date the times of strife from the first entry of wandering bandits (liukou) into Sichuan in 1633, the province endured nearly five decades of constant warfare until the suppression of the Three Feudatories Revolt in 1681” (p. 7). But most important of all are the book’s modern-day implications. The recurrence and frequency of genocide in today’s world cannot be understated. Nor can the other contemporary issues that Swope mentions in the final pages— climate change, refugee crises, and self-aggrandizing officials “who seem far more interested in protecting their own positions and interests than in tending to the pressing needs of society” (p. 310). In this regard, Swope suggests, the Qing might serve as an unlikely model for politicians today: “ . . . [T]he Qing succeeded in the end by united leadership and by prioritizing the basic needs and interests of their subjects. This was an elegantly simple conclusion, yet maddeningly difficult to accomplish” (p. 310). Perhaps Swope’s book will make the task somewhat less difficult, simply by illuminating a time and place that, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png China Review International University of Hawai'I Press

Revolution and Its Narratives: China's Socialist Literary and Cultural Imaginaries, 1949–1966 by Cai Xiang (review)

China Review International , Volume 24 (2) – Jun 4, 2019

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9367

Abstract

Reviews 151 of China was as continuously and as profoundly affected as the southwest in general and Sichuan in particular. If one were simply to date the times of strife from the first entry of wandering bandits (liukou) into Sichuan in 1633, the province endured nearly five decades of constant warfare until the suppression of the Three Feudatories Revolt in 1681” (p. 7). But most important of all are the book’s modern-day implications. The recurrence and frequency of genocide in today’s world cannot be understated. Nor can the other contemporary issues that Swope mentions in the final pages— climate change, refugee crises, and self-aggrandizing officials “who seem far more interested in protecting their own positions and interests than in tending to the pressing needs of society” (p. 310). In this regard, Swope suggests, the Qing might serve as an unlikely model for politicians today: “ . . . [T]he Qing succeeded in the end by united leadership and by prioritizing the basic needs and interests of their subjects. This was an elegantly simple conclusion, yet maddeningly difficult to accomplish” (p. 310). Perhaps Swope’s book will make the task somewhat less difficult, simply by illuminating a time and place that,

Journal

China Review InternationalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jun 4, 2019

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