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Response to "What Is Wrong with Us? What Is Wrong with the World?"

Response to "What Is Wrong with Us? What Is Wrong with the World?" Response to “What Is Wrong with Us? What Is Wrong with the World?” Kristin Johnston Largen It was my privilege to have the opportunity to respond to this excellent set of presentations. In so doing, I have structured my response as follows. First, I will make some comments about each paper individually. Then, I will suggest some points of interface and overlap, concluding with some more general questions and observations. Thomas Cattoi started us off with an interesting and provocative analysis of one specific doctrine of human nature, specifically as it relates to our sharing in the image and likeness of God, and also as it relates to sin. For those of us whose theological background is primarily with the Western Church, it is helpful to be reminded of the different conversations that were happening in the Eastern Church, as well as the different perspectives on the more universal questions, such as the doctrine of sin, for example. As Cattoi notes, one of the fundamental questions in this regard is what is “proper” to human nature: what humans possess by virtue of being human, and what they possess by virtue of participating in the divine nature. Because of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Buddhist-Christian Studies University of Hawai'I Press

Response to "What Is Wrong with Us? What Is Wrong with the World?"

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9472
Publisher site
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Abstract

Response to “What Is Wrong with Us? What Is Wrong with the World?” Kristin Johnston Largen It was my privilege to have the opportunity to respond to this excellent set of presentations. In so doing, I have structured my response as follows. First, I will make some comments about each paper individually. Then, I will suggest some points of interface and overlap, concluding with some more general questions and observations. Thomas Cattoi started us off with an interesting and provocative analysis of one specific doctrine of human nature, specifically as it relates to our sharing in the image and likeness of God, and also as it relates to sin. For those of us whose theological background is primarily with the Western Church, it is helpful to be reminded of the different conversations that were happening in the Eastern Church, as well as the different perspectives on the more universal questions, such as the doctrine of sin, for example. As Cattoi notes, one of the fundamental questions in this regard is what is “proper” to human nature: what humans possess by virtue of being human, and what they possess by virtue of participating in the divine nature. Because of

Journal

Buddhist-Christian StudiesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Oct 28, 2017

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