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Response to "The Oceanic Imaginary"

Response to "The Oceanic Imaginary" Modeling Community: A Response to "The Oceanic Imaginary" Caroline Sinavaiana-Gabbard Subramani's essay makes a noteworthy contribution to literary and cultural studies in Oceania in several important areas. In keeping with its genesis as a keynote address it duly offers an overview, problematizes the subject in a global context, and proposes a research agenda to address present and future challenges. I admire Subramani's commitment and pluck in undertaking such a daunting, but necessary task at this millennial crossroads in Oceania's social history. With the firm establishment of Oceanic writing, film, and performance on the world stage, the time has come for regional writers to articulate conceptual frameworks that offer access to more complex levels of meaning and understanding. This imperative has surfaced at conferences and meetings of regional writers with increasing urgency over the last decade. It's an idea whose time has come. Perhaps Subramani's greatest contribution here is to have made a start at all, to have offered this formal beginning. What I miss in the essay, however, is more recognition of the considerable amount of work, both past and present, already (being) accomplished by regional writers and others at the service of excavating Oceanic archives of knowledge. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

Response to "The Oceanic Imaginary"

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9464
Publisher site
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Abstract

Modeling Community: A Response to "The Oceanic Imaginary" Caroline Sinavaiana-Gabbard Subramani's essay makes a noteworthy contribution to literary and cultural studies in Oceania in several important areas. In keeping with its genesis as a keynote address it duly offers an overview, problematizes the subject in a global context, and proposes a research agenda to address present and future challenges. I admire Subramani's commitment and pluck in undertaking such a daunting, but necessary task at this millennial crossroads in Oceania's social history. With the firm establishment of Oceanic writing, film, and performance on the world stage, the time has come for regional writers to articulate conceptual frameworks that offer access to more complex levels of meaning and understanding. This imperative has surfaced at conferences and meetings of regional writers with increasing urgency over the last decade. It's an idea whose time has come. Perhaps Subramani's greatest contribution here is to have made a start at all, to have offered this formal beginning. What I miss in the essay, however, is more recognition of the considerable amount of work, both past and present, already (being) accomplished by regional writers and others at the service of excavating Oceanic archives of knowledge.

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jan 1, 2001

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