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Response to Regnault

Response to Regnault Bruno Barrillot and John Taroanui Doom The article by Jean-Marc Regnault on “The Nuclear Issue in the South Pacific” calls for a few reservations about the way it approaches the French nuclear tests in French Polynesia. The “Anglophone Plot” In this article, the author upholds the tired thesis of the “Anglophone plot” against the French presence in the Pacific. Thus he considers that the reactions to the installation of the Pacific Testing Center (cep) in the early 1960s came from New Zealand and Australia and that if the Tahitian pastors intervened in the debate, it was only, in the words of General de Gaulle (cited without giving the source) because they had been stirred up against France by the English and American pastors. This representation is contrary to reality, to which one is astonished that Regnault judged it useless to refer. On 7 September 1966 in Papeete, Deputy of Polynesia John Teariki pronounced a very virulent indictment against the nuclear tests in front of General de Gaulle, who came to “push the button” of the next blast over Moruroa. As for knowing whether the Polynesian representatives of the era had been influenced by the “anti- nuclear” New Zealanders or http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9464

Abstract

Bruno Barrillot and John Taroanui Doom The article by Jean-Marc Regnault on “The Nuclear Issue in the South Pacific” calls for a few reservations about the way it approaches the French nuclear tests in French Polynesia. The “Anglophone Plot” In this article, the author upholds the tired thesis of the “Anglophone plot” against the French presence in the Pacific. Thus he considers that the reactions to the installation of the Pacific Testing Center (cep) in the early 1960s came from New Zealand and Australia and that if the Tahitian pastors intervened in the debate, it was only, in the words of General de Gaulle (cited without giving the source) because they had been stirred up against France by the English and American pastors. This representation is contrary to reality, to which one is astonished that Regnault judged it useless to refer. On 7 September 1966 in Papeete, Deputy of Polynesia John Teariki pronounced a very virulent indictment against the nuclear tests in front of General de Gaulle, who came to “push the button” of the next blast over Moruroa. As for knowing whether the Polynesian representatives of the era had been influenced by the “anti- nuclear” New Zealanders or

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jul 29, 2005

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