Response to Amy Olberding, "Philosophical Exclusion and Conversational Practices"

Response to Amy Olberding, "Philosophical Exclusion and Conversational Practices" 26     Christian Coseru (Comment 38), “Can We Make Philosophy a Little Less Pro­ vincial?” http://www.newappsblog.com/2012/06/can-we-make-philosophy-alittle-less-provincial.html (accessed February 2, 2016). 27          (Comment 50), “Philosophy’s Western Bias and What Can be Done about it,” –r http://www.newappsblog.com/2014/09/philosophys-western-bias-and-whatcan-be-done-about-it.html (accessed February 2, 2016). 28    Ibid. –T 29          he assumption in this style of advice is that “mainstream philosophy journals” would be eager for Asian philosophical work if specialists would but write and submit it. However, the data do not support optimism on this score: despite significant and measurable surges in scholarship in Asian philosophies over the last many decades, purportedly mainstream journals typically show no increase in their publication rates of this work. For data and commentary on this issue, see Amy Olberding, “Chinese Philosophy and Wider Philosophical Discourse: Including Chinese Philosophy in General Audience Philosophy Journals,” APA Newletter on Asian and Asian-American Philosophies and Philosophers 15, no. 2 (Spring 2016). Response to Amy Olberding, “Philosophical Exclusion and Conversational Practices” Department of Political Science, University of Amsterdam nescio2@yahoo.com A full third of the book is devoted to “Buddhist themes,” and although I am unfortunately unqualified to comment on its exegetical and interpretative quality, I can report that I found the discussion fascinating http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Philosophy East and West University of Hawai'I Press

Response to Amy Olberding, "Philosophical Exclusion and Conversational Practices"

Philosophy East and West, Volume 67 (4) – Oct 20, 2017

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
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Copyright © 2008 University of Hawai'i Press.
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1529-1898
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Abstract

26     Christian Coseru (Comment 38), “Can We Make Philosophy a Little Less Pro­ vincial?” http://www.newappsblog.com/2012/06/can-we-make-philosophy-alittle-less-provincial.html (accessed February 2, 2016). 27          (Comment 50), “Philosophy’s Western Bias and What Can be Done about it,” –r http://www.newappsblog.com/2014/09/philosophys-western-bias-and-whatcan-be-done-about-it.html (accessed February 2, 2016). 28    Ibid. –T 29          he assumption in this style of advice is that “mainstream philosophy journals” would be eager for Asian philosophical work if specialists would but write and submit it. However, the data do not support optimism on this score: despite significant and measurable surges in scholarship in Asian philosophies over the last many decades, purportedly mainstream journals typically show no increase in their publication rates of this work. For data and commentary on this issue, see Amy Olberding, “Chinese Philosophy and Wider Philosophical Discourse: Including Chinese Philosophy in General Audience Philosophy Journals,” APA Newletter on Asian and Asian-American Philosophies and Philosophers 15, no. 2 (Spring 2016). Response to Amy Olberding, “Philosophical Exclusion and Conversational Practices” Department of Political Science, University of Amsterdam nescio2@yahoo.com A full third of the book is devoted to “Buddhist themes,” and although I am unfortunately unqualified to comment on its exegetical and interpretative quality, I can report that I found the discussion fascinating

Journal

Philosophy East and WestUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Oct 20, 2017

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