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Rereading The Stone: Desire and the Making of Fiction in Dream of the Red Chamber (review)

Rereading The Stone: Desire and the Making of Fiction in Dream of the Red Chamber (review) Anthony C. Yu. Rereading The Stone: Desire and the Making of Fiction in Dream of the Red Chamber. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1997. xv, 321 pp. Hardcover, ISBN 0­691­01561­9. One could write an interesting study of Chinese intellectual life during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries purely in terms of the indigenous critiques of the great late-eighteenth-century novel Hongloumeng (The Dream of the Red Chamber, also translated as The Story of the Stone, from one of its earliest Chinese titles, Shitouji; hereafter simply The Stone or Stone). Over the years, almost every part of the Chinese-speaking literary, philosophical, religious, and political universe (not to mention linguistic, economic, culinary, sartorial, medical, botanical, horticultural, architectural, historical, and art-historical) has become somehow or other engaged with the novel and its interpretation (even Madame Mao considered herself "Half-a-Stonologist"). How should the book be read? Should it be read at all? If so, what should be read into it, or out of it? Is it really a novel at all? 1 Is it a rambling roman-à-clef dealing with dark Imperial or Manchu secrets (the Suoyin School)? A penetrating exposure of the vanity of human passion and of mundane reality, à la Zen? A more http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png China Review International University of Hawai'I Press

Rereading The Stone: Desire and the Making of Fiction in Dream of the Red Chamber (review)

China Review International , Volume 6 (2) – Sep 1, 1999

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University of Hawai'I Press
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Copyright by University of Hawaii Press
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1527-9367
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Abstract

Anthony C. Yu. Rereading The Stone: Desire and the Making of Fiction in Dream of the Red Chamber. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1997. xv, 321 pp. Hardcover, ISBN 0­691­01561­9. One could write an interesting study of Chinese intellectual life during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries purely in terms of the indigenous critiques of the great late-eighteenth-century novel Hongloumeng (The Dream of the Red Chamber, also translated as The Story of the Stone, from one of its earliest Chinese titles, Shitouji; hereafter simply The Stone or Stone). Over the years, almost every part of the Chinese-speaking literary, philosophical, religious, and political universe (not to mention linguistic, economic, culinary, sartorial, medical, botanical, horticultural, architectural, historical, and art-historical) has become somehow or other engaged with the novel and its interpretation (even Madame Mao considered herself "Half-a-Stonologist"). How should the book be read? Should it be read at all? If so, what should be read into it, or out of it? Is it really a novel at all? 1 Is it a rambling roman-à-clef dealing with dark Imperial or Manchu secrets (the Suoyin School)? A penetrating exposure of the vanity of human passion and of mundane reality, à la Zen? A more

Journal

China Review InternationalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Sep 1, 1999

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