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Represented Communities: Fiji and World Decolonization (review)

Represented Communities: Fiji and World Decolonization (review) the contemporary pacific · fall 2003 The authors remind us that it is no accident that deep, horizontal bonds of nationhood have failed to develop in much of the decolonized world. Colonizers defined and maintained differences between social categories. For a variety of reasons, specific to their local contexts, these divisions often continue into the present. Fiji is an excellent example to illustrate this problem. Out of his need to make the new colony self-supporting and his desire to shield native Fijians, Fiji's first governor promoted the growth of a sugar industry based on labor recruited in British India. The authors remind us that the thousands of Indians who came to Fiji differed in language, region of origin, religion, and caste and did not identify themselves in terms of the overarching category "Indian" prior to their arrival in the colony. Once in Fiji there was no escaping that identity, but Fijians also differed (and differ) among themselves. In the context of the colonial legal and political systems, however, both Indians and Fijians were treated as blocs and positioned below Europeans. The relative positions of these two major ethnic blocs were not so much hierarchical in nature as they http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

Represented Communities: Fiji and World Decolonization (review)

The Contemporary Pacific , Volume 15 (2) – Aug 7, 2003

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9464
Publisher site
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Abstract

the contemporary pacific · fall 2003 The authors remind us that it is no accident that deep, horizontal bonds of nationhood have failed to develop in much of the decolonized world. Colonizers defined and maintained differences between social categories. For a variety of reasons, specific to their local contexts, these divisions often continue into the present. Fiji is an excellent example to illustrate this problem. Out of his need to make the new colony self-supporting and his desire to shield native Fijians, Fiji's first governor promoted the growth of a sugar industry based on labor recruited in British India. The authors remind us that the thousands of Indians who came to Fiji differed in language, region of origin, religion, and caste and did not identify themselves in terms of the overarching category "Indian" prior to their arrival in the colony. Once in Fiji there was no escaping that identity, but Fijians also differed (and differ) among themselves. In the context of the colonial legal and political systems, however, both Indians and Fijians were treated as blocs and positioned below Europeans. The relative positions of these two major ethnic blocs were not so much hierarchical in nature as they

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Aug 7, 2003

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