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Reply to Stephen Angle

Reply to Stephen Angle 3    –    Ibid., p. 216. –     4     See Richard Rorty, “Cosmopolitanism without Emancipation: A Response to Jean-François Lyotard,” in Objectivity, Relativism, and Truth (Cambridge: Cam­ bridge University Press, 1991). 5    –    Flanagan, The Geography of Morals, p. 318 n. 14. Danielle Macbeth The idea of natural truth is the idea of truths that are the same for all rational beings with our biological form of life. The thought is that in regard to at least some issues, for example the ontological status of fish, there are natural truths, and that it is the task of philosophy in particular to discover such truths. In my essay I distinguish such truths from empirical truths such as, for example, that water nourishes plants or that there are black swans, as well as from matters of taste. Angle reminds us of yet ­ nother sort of truth that is not amenable to the kind of treatment that I outline for natural truth. It is not, or at least seems not to be, a natural truth that one ought (or ought not) to rid oneself of anger. Whether one ought to rid oneself of anger may well be a question that one must answer for oneself insofar http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Philosophy East and West University of Hawai'I Press

Reply to Stephen Angle

Philosophy East and West , Volume 67 (4) – Oct 20, 2017

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1529-1898
Publisher site
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Abstract

3    –    Ibid., p. 216. –     4     See Richard Rorty, “Cosmopolitanism without Emancipation: A Response to Jean-François Lyotard,” in Objectivity, Relativism, and Truth (Cambridge: Cam­ bridge University Press, 1991). 5    –    Flanagan, The Geography of Morals, p. 318 n. 14. Danielle Macbeth The idea of natural truth is the idea of truths that are the same for all rational beings with our biological form of life. The thought is that in regard to at least some issues, for example the ontological status of fish, there are natural truths, and that it is the task of philosophy in particular to discover such truths. In my essay I distinguish such truths from empirical truths such as, for example, that water nourishes plants or that there are black swans, as well as from matters of taste. Angle reminds us of yet ­ nother sort of truth that is not amenable to the kind of treatment that I outline for natural truth. It is not, or at least seems not to be, a natural truth that one ought (or ought not) to rid oneself of anger. Whether one ought to rid oneself of anger may well be a question that one must answer for oneself insofar

Journal

Philosophy East and WestUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Oct 20, 2017

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