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Reply to Charles Goodman

Reply to Charles Goodman Adrian Kuzminski Independent Scholar adriankuzminski@gmail.com I am grateful for Prof. Goodman’s comments. Let me try to respond briefly. He asks me to explain how we can recognize “the pragmata as they are, while refraining from judgments about them.” In my reading of Sextus Empiricus, what he calls “appearances” are what we perceive immediately and involuntarily, that is, the thoughts and sensations that are present to us as we actually experience them. Visually, these are shapes and colors and tones; audibly, they are sounds of varying intensity and quality; and so on for the other senses. Similarly, our thoughts—imaginings and memories—are all immediately and involuntarily present as we have them. (If you think of your mother, you cannot but help have a “mental image” of her, and not someone else.) These various shapes, colors, sounds, smells, tastes, touches, and thoughts recur in our experience (we recognize, over and over again, the same shapes, colors, sounds, tastes, touches, smells, and thoughts). But we experience them in varying combinations with one another, and these combinations are subject to change. The sound we recognize as Middle C on the piano may be sharp and staccato, or soft and sustained. We can hear it http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Philosophy East and West University of Hawai'I Press

Reply to Charles Goodman

Philosophy East and West , Volume 68 (3) – Aug 8, 2018

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1529-1898

Abstract

Adrian Kuzminski Independent Scholar adriankuzminski@gmail.com I am grateful for Prof. Goodman’s comments. Let me try to respond briefly. He asks me to explain how we can recognize “the pragmata as they are, while refraining from judgments about them.” In my reading of Sextus Empiricus, what he calls “appearances” are what we perceive immediately and involuntarily, that is, the thoughts and sensations that are present to us as we actually experience them. Visually, these are shapes and colors and tones; audibly, they are sounds of varying intensity and quality; and so on for the other senses. Similarly, our thoughts—imaginings and memories—are all immediately and involuntarily present as we have them. (If you think of your mother, you cannot but help have a “mental image” of her, and not someone else.) These various shapes, colors, sounds, smells, tastes, touches, and thoughts recur in our experience (we recognize, over and over again, the same shapes, colors, sounds, tastes, touches, smells, and thoughts). But we experience them in varying combinations with one another, and these combinations are subject to change. The sound we recognize as Middle C on the piano may be sharp and staccato, or soft and sustained. We can hear it

Journal

Philosophy East and WestUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Aug 8, 2018

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