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Remembering War: The Great War between History and Memory in the 20th Century (review)

Remembering War: The Great War between History and Memory in the 20th Century (review) 382 Biography 30.3 (Summer 2007) Autobiography might, for instance, be seen as drawing on colonial discourses of city planning and a diseased Other, while Nehru’s interest in mountain- eering seems often to draw on imperial accounts of exploration as much as it revives an indigenous adventure tradition. If texts such as the Jävïd Näma and Nehru’s An Autobiography are foundationally postnational, one also might wonder at the relative ease with which nationalist discourse in both Pakistan and India has made substantial use of them. Majeed’s tendency to rely on tex- tual readings unsupported by archival work may at times encourage such self- confirming reading. He twice quotes a 1940 letter from Nehru to Madame Chiang Kai-shek stating that the Indian politician is writing an extension to his autobiography to argue the fact that Nehru viewed The Discovery of India as autobiography. Nehru’s papers in Teenmurti House, New Delhi, however, reveal a different story: he began to write a second volume of the autobiogra- phy, but then abandoned the project. The Discovery of India grew out of one of the early chapters of the book project, and there is no evidence I know of that Nehru considered it an autobiography http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Biography University of Hawai'I Press

Remembering War: The Great War between History and Memory in the 20th Century (review)

Biography , Volume 30 (3) – Oct 1, 2007

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 Biographical Research Center.
ISSN
0162-4962
eISSN
1529-1456

Abstract

382 Biography 30.3 (Summer 2007) Autobiography might, for instance, be seen as drawing on colonial discourses of city planning and a diseased Other, while Nehru’s interest in mountain- eering seems often to draw on imperial accounts of exploration as much as it revives an indigenous adventure tradition. If texts such as the Jävïd Näma and Nehru’s An Autobiography are foundationally postnational, one also might wonder at the relative ease with which nationalist discourse in both Pakistan and India has made substantial use of them. Majeed’s tendency to rely on tex- tual readings unsupported by archival work may at times encourage such self- confirming reading. He twice quotes a 1940 letter from Nehru to Madame Chiang Kai-shek stating that the Indian politician is writing an extension to his autobiography to argue the fact that Nehru viewed The Discovery of India as autobiography. Nehru’s papers in Teenmurti House, New Delhi, however, reveal a different story: he began to write a second volume of the autobiogra- phy, but then abandoned the project. The Discovery of India grew out of one of the early chapters of the book project, and there is no evidence I know of that Nehru considered it an autobiography

Journal

BiographyUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Oct 1, 2007

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