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Remembering Roger Corless

Remembering Roger Corless NEWS AND VIEWS When I think of Roger Corless, I think of the bristlecone pine trees in the White Mountains of east-central California, about an hour's drive from Bishop up White Mountain Road. These trees (Pinus longaeva) are the world's oldest living beings. The senior member of the stand in Patriarch Grove, named Methuselah, is more than 4,700 years old. It is not because Roger lived an especially long life--he was granted only sixty-nine-and-a-half years of calendar time--that he and these trees fuse in my mind. While Roger was an old soul from an older world, this association arises from Roger's adherence to the kind of ``become who you are'' eccentricity celebrated by Henry David Thoreau and other sages who remind each of us to ``step to the music'' of ``a different drummer.'' When visiting the bristlecones, one is impressed by the various odd poses struck by each tree. Of course no two are alike; each holds a unique gnarly stance that says, ``You are among a community of nonconformists.'' These trees remind us that each being is a unique expression of Nature and ought to be honored as such. Thoreau does not use the word ``eccentric'' in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Buddhist-Christian Studies University of Hawai'I Press

Remembering Roger Corless

Buddhist-Christian Studies , Volume 27 (1) – Aug 30, 2007

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 The University of Hawai'i Press. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1527-9472
Publisher site
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Abstract

NEWS AND VIEWS When I think of Roger Corless, I think of the bristlecone pine trees in the White Mountains of east-central California, about an hour's drive from Bishop up White Mountain Road. These trees (Pinus longaeva) are the world's oldest living beings. The senior member of the stand in Patriarch Grove, named Methuselah, is more than 4,700 years old. It is not because Roger lived an especially long life--he was granted only sixty-nine-and-a-half years of calendar time--that he and these trees fuse in my mind. While Roger was an old soul from an older world, this association arises from Roger's adherence to the kind of ``become who you are'' eccentricity celebrated by Henry David Thoreau and other sages who remind each of us to ``step to the music'' of ``a different drummer.'' When visiting the bristlecones, one is impressed by the various odd poses struck by each tree. Of course no two are alike; each holds a unique gnarly stance that says, ``You are among a community of nonconformists.'' These trees remind us that each being is a unique expression of Nature and ought to be honored as such. Thoreau does not use the word ``eccentric'' in

Journal

Buddhist-Christian StudiesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Aug 30, 2007

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