Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Remembering Larry Ford

Remembering Larry Ford Professor Emeritus of Geography, University of Oregon Everett G. Smith Larry Ford's untimely death in September 2009 has silenced America's leading urban geographer. Larry loved cities. He visited and studied them everywhere--throughout North and South America as well as in Europe, Africa, Asia, and Oceania. No person has been in more cities throughout the world than Larry. He examined urban environments directly and up close, the way most of us see real cities, that is, on foot from the street. Urban views from cars, trains, planes, and even bikes soon become blurred and forgettable images of motion. Larry approached the city as a walker. He observed forms, shapes, sizes, and colors of buildings and appreciated their three-dimensional qualities. He looked at the designs of buildings, saw how they fit together, identified what goes on inside, and located with his mental map where they were in the geography of a city. Larry shared what he had seen and experienced--in the classroom, in public presentations, and in print. He made the modern city, especially the American, intelligible to a worldwide audience. I have known Larry since he and his wife Jan arrived in Eugene in the fall of 1967 to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Yearbook of the Association of Pacific Coast Geographers University of Hawai'I Press

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-hawai-i-press/remembering-larry-ford-WtyunedNvv
Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Hawai'I Press
ISSN
1551-3211
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Professor Emeritus of Geography, University of Oregon Everett G. Smith Larry Ford's untimely death in September 2009 has silenced America's leading urban geographer. Larry loved cities. He visited and studied them everywhere--throughout North and South America as well as in Europe, Africa, Asia, and Oceania. No person has been in more cities throughout the world than Larry. He examined urban environments directly and up close, the way most of us see real cities, that is, on foot from the street. Urban views from cars, trains, planes, and even bikes soon become blurred and forgettable images of motion. Larry approached the city as a walker. He observed forms, shapes, sizes, and colors of buildings and appreciated their three-dimensional qualities. He looked at the designs of buildings, saw how they fit together, identified what goes on inside, and located with his mental map where they were in the geography of a city. Larry shared what he had seen and experienced--in the classroom, in public presentations, and in print. He made the modern city, especially the American, intelligible to a worldwide audience. I have known Larry since he and his wife Jan arrived in Eugene in the fall of 1967 to

Journal

Yearbook of the Association of Pacific Coast GeographersUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jul 13, 2011

There are no references for this article.