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Remastering Morals with Aristotle and Confucius (review)

Remastering Morals with Aristotle and Confucius (review) BOOK REVIEWS Remastering Morals with Aristotle and Confucius. By May Sim. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2007. Pp. 237. Hardcover. Reviewed by Christine Swanton University of Auckland Remastering Morals with Aristotle and Confucius by May Sim is a rich and wideranging work comparing two ``virtue oriented'' philosophers both of whom are synonymous with important traditions. These are the virtue ethics of Aristotle and what one might call the virtue-oriented role ethics of Confucius. The book is not just a catalog of similarities and differences, though these are significant. Sim also goes deeply into some fundamental issues in ethics, which, alas, have become somewhat invisible in the dominant strands of current analytic ethics: the importance of character, the centrality of roles to an ethical life, and the importance of the Doctrine of the Mean to the understanding of right action. My discussion will focus on what I consider to be three basic issues considered at length by Sim. These may be broadly described thus: (1) The problem of moral relativism, (2) the nature of the ethics of roles, and (3) how action can be assessed as right. We consider each of these issues in turn. 1. A basic issue is http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Philosophy East and West University of Hawai'I Press

Remastering Morals with Aristotle and Confucius (review)

Philosophy East and West , Volume 59 (2) – Apr 17, 2009

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University of Hawai'I Press
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Copyright © University of Hawai'I Press
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1529-1898
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Abstract

BOOK REVIEWS Remastering Morals with Aristotle and Confucius. By May Sim. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2007. Pp. 237. Hardcover. Reviewed by Christine Swanton University of Auckland Remastering Morals with Aristotle and Confucius by May Sim is a rich and wideranging work comparing two ``virtue oriented'' philosophers both of whom are synonymous with important traditions. These are the virtue ethics of Aristotle and what one might call the virtue-oriented role ethics of Confucius. The book is not just a catalog of similarities and differences, though these are significant. Sim also goes deeply into some fundamental issues in ethics, which, alas, have become somewhat invisible in the dominant strands of current analytic ethics: the importance of character, the centrality of roles to an ethical life, and the importance of the Doctrine of the Mean to the understanding of right action. My discussion will focus on what I consider to be three basic issues considered at length by Sim. These may be broadly described thus: (1) The problem of moral relativism, (2) the nature of the ethics of roles, and (3) how action can be assessed as right. We consider each of these issues in turn. 1. A basic issue is

Journal

Philosophy East and WestUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Apr 17, 2009

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