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Religious Experience and Lay Society in T'ang China: A Reading of Tai Fu's Kuang-i chi (review)

Religious Experience and Lay Society in T'ang China: A Reading of Tai Fu's Kuang-i chi (review) 120 China Review International: Vol. 5, No. 1, Spring 1998 Glen Dudbridge. Religious Experience and Lay Society in Vang China: A Reading of Tai Fus Kuang-i chi. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1995. viii, 256 pp. Hardcover $59.95, isbn 0-521-48223-2. "Accounts of anomalies" has been an important literary genre throughout Chinese history. Texts that contain strange, extraordinary tales derived from the zhiguai ????? fiction of the Six Dynasties or the chuanqi Hj- nf fiction of the Tang have been the subject of recent scholarship, which has led to increased interest in these accounts.1 This recent scholarship is likely to change the traditional image of fiction, or xiaoshuo ^MA, in general and of anomaly accounts in particular. Glen Dudbridge's new book attempts to redefine what is meant by anomaly accounts. He treats a particular xiaoshuo text with anomalous tales and fantasy as "a literature of record, not of fantasy or creative fiction" (p. 16). The text in question is the Guangyiji JÜHlö (Great book of marvels), which was incorporated into the Taiping guangji ^2PIiIgS (A comprehensive record compiled in the Taiping [Xingguo] reign period), compiled in 977-978 during the reign of Emperor Taizong ^?t? (r. 976-997) of the Song. The http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png China Review International University of Hawai'I Press

Religious Experience and Lay Society in T'ang China: A Reading of Tai Fu's Kuang-i chi (review)

China Review International , Volume 5 (1) – Mar 30, 1998

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Abstract

120 China Review International: Vol. 5, No. 1, Spring 1998 Glen Dudbridge. Religious Experience and Lay Society in Vang China: A Reading of Tai Fus Kuang-i chi. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1995. viii, 256 pp. Hardcover $59.95, isbn 0-521-48223-2. "Accounts of anomalies" has been an important literary genre throughout Chinese history. Texts that contain strange, extraordinary tales derived from the zhiguai ????? fiction of the Six Dynasties or the chuanqi Hj- nf fiction of the Tang have been the subject of recent scholarship, which has led to increased interest in these accounts.1 This recent scholarship is likely to change the traditional image of fiction, or xiaoshuo ^MA, in general and of anomaly accounts in particular. Glen Dudbridge's new book attempts to redefine what is meant by anomaly accounts. He treats a particular xiaoshuo text with anomalous tales and fantasy as "a literature of record, not of fantasy or creative fiction" (p. 16). The text in question is the Guangyiji JÜHlö (Great book of marvels), which was incorporated into the Taiping guangji ^2PIiIgS (A comprehensive record compiled in the Taiping [Xingguo] reign period), compiled in 977-978 during the reign of Emperor Taizong ^?t? (r. 976-997) of the Song. The

Journal

China Review InternationalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Mar 30, 1998

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