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Reinventing Chinese Tradition: The Cultural Politics of Late Socialism by Ka-ming Wu (review)

Reinventing Chinese Tradition: The Cultural Politics of Late Socialism by Ka-ming Wu (review) Reviews 83 the workforce, they are still objectified quite oen in s ft ociety, as can be seen in the designations of unmarried women in their late twenties as “leftovers,” and prosti- tutes as a “cancer of society.” It is fascinating to compare twenty-first-century China with the late Qing period Widmer depicts. In the first generation, Wang Qingdi was a free spirit with an enthusiastic ambition for the fulfillment of her talent, even though society did not value woman’s talent in writing. And in the second generation, we have much to learn in contemplating Zhan Xi’s acknowl- edgment of women’s abilities and Zhan Kai’s admiration of women’s power, portay- ing courtesans as the leading heroines. Interestingly enough, all those courtesan characters could be traced easily to their prototypes in real life, making it uplifting and intoxicating for a female audience nowadays to read, “women can ae ff ct China’s future in important ways” (p. 147). Widmer finds a perfect angle, a perfect family, and a perfect era to produce a genuinely feminist literary family history. Finally, to borrow Zhan Kai’s line, “Women, take heed!” (p. 230). Guo Chen Guo Chen is a senior lecturer of cultural comparisons in the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png China Review International University of Hawai'I Press

Reinventing Chinese Tradition: The Cultural Politics of Late Socialism by Ka-ming Wu (review)

China Review International , Volume 22 (1) – Apr 14, 2017

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9367

Abstract

Reviews 83 the workforce, they are still objectified quite oen in s ft ociety, as can be seen in the designations of unmarried women in their late twenties as “leftovers,” and prosti- tutes as a “cancer of society.” It is fascinating to compare twenty-first-century China with the late Qing period Widmer depicts. In the first generation, Wang Qingdi was a free spirit with an enthusiastic ambition for the fulfillment of her talent, even though society did not value woman’s talent in writing. And in the second generation, we have much to learn in contemplating Zhan Xi’s acknowl- edgment of women’s abilities and Zhan Kai’s admiration of women’s power, portay- ing courtesans as the leading heroines. Interestingly enough, all those courtesan characters could be traced easily to their prototypes in real life, making it uplifting and intoxicating for a female audience nowadays to read, “women can ae ff ct China’s future in important ways” (p. 147). Widmer finds a perfect angle, a perfect family, and a perfect era to produce a genuinely feminist literary family history. Finally, to borrow Zhan Kai’s line, “Women, take heed!” (p. 230). Guo Chen Guo Chen is a senior lecturer of cultural comparisons in the

Journal

China Review InternationalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Apr 14, 2017

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