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Reinhabitation

Reinhabitation G A R Y S N Y D E R The following is based on a talk given at the Reinhabitation Conference at North San Juan School, sponsored by the California Council on the Humanities, August 1976. It was published in The Old Ways (City Lights, 1977) and reprinted in A Place in Space (Counterpoint, 1995). I came to the Pacific slope by a line of people that somehow worked their way west from the Atlantic over 150 years. One grandfather ended up in the Territory of Washington and homesteaded in Kitsap County. My mother's side were railroad people down in Texas, and before that they'd worked the silver mines in Leadville, Colorado. My grandfather being a homesteader and my father a native of the state of Washington put our family relatively early in the Northwest. But there were people already there, long before my family, I learned as a boy. An elderly Salish Indian gentleman came by our farm once every few months in a Model T truck, selling smoked salmon. "Who is he?" "He's an Indian," my parents said. Looking at all the different trees and plants that made up my secondgrowth Douglas fir forest plus http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Manoa University of Hawai'I Press

Reinhabitation

Manoa , Volume 25 (1) – Jul 10, 2013

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-943x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

G A R Y S N Y D E R The following is based on a talk given at the Reinhabitation Conference at North San Juan School, sponsored by the California Council on the Humanities, August 1976. It was published in The Old Ways (City Lights, 1977) and reprinted in A Place in Space (Counterpoint, 1995). I came to the Pacific slope by a line of people that somehow worked their way west from the Atlantic over 150 years. One grandfather ended up in the Territory of Washington and homesteaded in Kitsap County. My mother's side were railroad people down in Texas, and before that they'd worked the silver mines in Leadville, Colorado. My grandfather being a homesteader and my father a native of the state of Washington put our family relatively early in the Northwest. But there were people already there, long before my family, I learned as a boy. An elderly Salish Indian gentleman came by our farm once every few months in a Model T truck, selling smoked salmon. "Who is he?" "He's an Indian," my parents said. Looking at all the different trees and plants that made up my secondgrowth Douglas fir forest plus

Journal

ManoaUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jul 10, 2013

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