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Rediscovering an Extraordinary Woman: A Reinterpretation of the Late Qing Reforms

Rediscovering an Extraordinary Woman: A Reinterpretation of the Late Qing Reforms Features 11 ism, but this revolution failed and instead paved the way for a grossly unequal and unjust society under the highly centralized party-state that is today wedded to global capitalism. As such, is there any alternative for socialism to succeed and for capitalist domination and exploitation to be curbed, without harking back to revolution itself as a solution? Wu, for his part, calls for a more rigorous critique of state capitalism. One would hope to see the emergence of a critique of ideology. Here ideology is understood not only as Mao’s essential means (mobilizing the masses) and ends (creating a utopian society) but also as the conceptual frame- work that centrally shapes contemporary Western Marxism. Whereas Andrew Walder’s picture of Chinese Revolution somehow leaves out this central piece of ideology, perhaps because the political high drama is more appealing than impal- pable and abstract ideas, in Yiching Wu’s case ideology in the Western leftist tradition ostensibly foregrounds his “historically grounded interpretation.” Thus, it is imperative to interrogate in a self-reflexive manner the trajectory of revolution- ary ideology in China and its global implications. Liu Kang Liu Kang is the Zhiyuan Chair Professor at Shanghai Jiao Tong University, China, and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png China Review International University of Hawai'I Press

Rediscovering an Extraordinary Woman: A Reinterpretation of the Late Qing Reforms

China Review International , Volume 21 (1) – Aug 3, 2016

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9367

Abstract

Features 11 ism, but this revolution failed and instead paved the way for a grossly unequal and unjust society under the highly centralized party-state that is today wedded to global capitalism. As such, is there any alternative for socialism to succeed and for capitalist domination and exploitation to be curbed, without harking back to revolution itself as a solution? Wu, for his part, calls for a more rigorous critique of state capitalism. One would hope to see the emergence of a critique of ideology. Here ideology is understood not only as Mao’s essential means (mobilizing the masses) and ends (creating a utopian society) but also as the conceptual frame- work that centrally shapes contemporary Western Marxism. Whereas Andrew Walder’s picture of Chinese Revolution somehow leaves out this central piece of ideology, perhaps because the political high drama is more appealing than impal- pable and abstract ideas, in Yiching Wu’s case ideology in the Western leftist tradition ostensibly foregrounds his “historically grounded interpretation.” Thus, it is imperative to interrogate in a self-reflexive manner the trajectory of revolution- ary ideology in China and its global implications. Liu Kang Liu Kang is the Zhiyuan Chair Professor at Shanghai Jiao Tong University, China, and

Journal

China Review InternationalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Aug 3, 2016

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