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Readings from the Lu-Wang School of Neo-Confucianism (review)

Readings from the Lu-Wang School of Neo-Confucianism (review) sionsofferedbyA.C.Graham(Chuang-tz: The Seven Inner Chapters and Other Writings from the Book Chuang-tz[London:GeorgeAllenandUnwin,1981])andLiuXiaogan (Classifying the Zhuangzi Chapters[AnnArbor:UniversityofMichiganPress,1994])of thetexttowhichCoutinhomakesreferenceareuseful,buttheanalysisofChurhymeand theinnerchaptersinDavidMcCraw'sStratifying Zhuangzi: Rhyme and other Quantitative Evidence(Taibei:AcademicaSinica,forthcoming)underminestheplacementofasingle ZhuangZhouinChuandpointstowardachorusofauthorswithintheZhuangzi'sfirst sevenchapters. Readings from the Lu-Wang School of Neo-Confucianism.Translatedwithintroductions by Philip J. Ivanhoe. Indianapolis: Hackett Publishing Company, 2009. Pp. xi+197.Paper$14.95. ReviewedbyJeeLoo Liu CaliforniaStateUniversityatFullerton AnewsetoftranslationsofworksbyNeo-Confuciansisadesperatelyneededproject forthestudyofChinesephilosophy,andPhilipJ.Ivanhoe,inhisnewbookReadings from the Lu-Wang School of Neo-Confucianism,hastakenanadmirableleadinhis selective translations of two prominent Neo-Confucians, Lu Xiangshan andWang Yangming, known together as the Lu-Wang School. Readings from the Lu-Wang Schoolreflectsadeepphilosophicalunderstandingofthetwophilosophers'views, andacomprehensiveknowledgeofthetraditionofChinesephilosophy.Thetranslatedtextisaccompaniedbyhelpfulintroductionstoeachphilosopheranddetailed scholarlynotations.Thesenotations,alongwiththeeleganttranslationandrepresentativeselectionsofthetext,makethisbooktheauthoritativeeditionoftheLu-Wang worksinEnglish. ThewritingsofNeo-ConfucianshavenotbeenadequatelytranslatedintoEnglish,andthisisamainreasonwhyNeo-Confucianphilosophyisnotwidelyknown intheEnglish-speakingworld.ManyphilosophersworkingonChinesephilosophy lackamasteryofChineseandmustrelyonexistingtranslations.Theonlycomprehensive translations from all of the major Neo-Confucian works are compiled in Wing-tsitChan'sA Source Book in Chinese Philosophy(PrincetonUniversityPress, 1963).However,itisnoteasytoengageinrespectablephilosophicalstudyofNeoConfucianism on the basis of this source book alone. Ivanhoe's translation of Lu Xiangshan'sandWangYangming'sworksisthusawelcomeendeavor. WhenthereadermustrelyonexistingtranslationstoapproachChinesephilosophy,shewouldnaturallywonderwhethertheselectionisrepresentativeofthephilosophers'viewsandwhetherthetranslationaccuratelycapturesthephilosophical spiritofthesephilosophers.Ivanhoe'sReadingscandispelsuchworries.Withboth Lu Xiangshan andWangYangming, Ivanhoe's selections are more comprehensive than Chan's Source Book. Ivanhoe's choice of Lu Xiangshan's work is similar to Chan's selections, including Lu's philosophical correspondence with friends, his short essays, and his recorded sayings. Ivanhoe does not provide as many quotes fromLu'srecordedsayingsasChandoes,andthisisaminordrawbackofthebook. PhilosophyEast&WestVolume61,Number2April2011388­391 ©2011byUniversityofHawai`iPress However,Chan'sselectionfromLu'slettersorotherwritingsamountstoscantyparagraphsorremarksoutofcontext,whileIvanhoeplaceshisselectionsintheiroriginal contextbycoveringamajorpartofeachpiece.Chan'sselectionsfromWangYangming'sworkincludeonlyWang'sInquiry on the Great Learning (Daxuewen) andInstructions for Practical Living (Chuanxilu),whereasIvanhoe'sReadings includesboththesedocuments(whichhetranslatesasQuestions on the Great LearningandA Record for Practice),aswellasadditionalselectionsfromWang'sphilosophicalcorrespondenceandhispoetry.Overall,Ivanhoe'sReadingsgivesamore complete presentation of the two philosophers' philosophical writings than the Source Bookdoes.Onealsogetstoseemoreofthephilosophers'personalitiesfrom thevariouswritingstylesselected. IncomparingIvanhoe'sReadingstotheoriginalChinesetexts,Iwasoftenstruck bytheingeniouschoiceofwordsthatIvanhoemakes.ThechoicesreflectIvanhoe's philosophicalinsightsonthephilosophyatissue.Forexample,onewouldnaturally betemptedtotranslateWangYangming'sphrasebentias"substance"(asChan http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Philosophy East and West University of Hawai'I Press

Readings from the Lu-Wang School of Neo-Confucianism (review)

Philosophy East and West , Volume 61 (2) – Apr 27, 2011

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Abstract

sionsofferedbyA.C.Graham(Chuang-tz: The Seven Inner Chapters and Other Writings from the Book Chuang-tz[London:GeorgeAllenandUnwin,1981])andLiuXiaogan (Classifying the Zhuangzi Chapters[AnnArbor:UniversityofMichiganPress,1994])of thetexttowhichCoutinhomakesreferenceareuseful,buttheanalysisofChurhymeand theinnerchaptersinDavidMcCraw'sStratifying Zhuangzi: Rhyme and other Quantitative Evidence(Taibei:AcademicaSinica,forthcoming)underminestheplacementofasingle ZhuangZhouinChuandpointstowardachorusofauthorswithintheZhuangzi'sfirst sevenchapters. Readings from the Lu-Wang School of Neo-Confucianism.Translatedwithintroductions by Philip J. Ivanhoe. Indianapolis: Hackett Publishing Company, 2009. Pp. xi+197.Paper$14.95. ReviewedbyJeeLoo Liu CaliforniaStateUniversityatFullerton AnewsetoftranslationsofworksbyNeo-Confuciansisadesperatelyneededproject forthestudyofChinesephilosophy,andPhilipJ.Ivanhoe,inhisnewbookReadings from the Lu-Wang School of Neo-Confucianism,hastakenanadmirableleadinhis selective translations of two prominent Neo-Confucians, Lu Xiangshan andWang Yangming, known together as the Lu-Wang School. Readings from the Lu-Wang Schoolreflectsadeepphilosophicalunderstandingofthetwophilosophers'views, andacomprehensiveknowledgeofthetraditionofChinesephilosophy.Thetranslatedtextisaccompaniedbyhelpfulintroductionstoeachphilosopheranddetailed scholarlynotations.Thesenotations,alongwiththeeleganttranslationandrepresentativeselectionsofthetext,makethisbooktheauthoritativeeditionoftheLu-Wang worksinEnglish. ThewritingsofNeo-ConfucianshavenotbeenadequatelytranslatedintoEnglish,andthisisamainreasonwhyNeo-Confucianphilosophyisnotwidelyknown intheEnglish-speakingworld.ManyphilosophersworkingonChinesephilosophy lackamasteryofChineseandmustrelyonexistingtranslations.Theonlycomprehensive translations from all of the major Neo-Confucian works are compiled in Wing-tsitChan'sA Source Book in Chinese Philosophy(PrincetonUniversityPress, 1963).However,itisnoteasytoengageinrespectablephilosophicalstudyofNeoConfucianism on the basis of this source book alone. Ivanhoe's translation of Lu Xiangshan'sandWangYangming'sworksisthusawelcomeendeavor. WhenthereadermustrelyonexistingtranslationstoapproachChinesephilosophy,shewouldnaturallywonderwhethertheselectionisrepresentativeofthephilosophers'viewsandwhetherthetranslationaccuratelycapturesthephilosophical spiritofthesephilosophers.Ivanhoe'sReadingscandispelsuchworries.Withboth Lu Xiangshan andWangYangming, Ivanhoe's selections are more comprehensive than Chan's Source Book. Ivanhoe's choice of Lu Xiangshan's work is similar to Chan's selections, including Lu's philosophical correspondence with friends, his short essays, and his recorded sayings. Ivanhoe does not provide as many quotes fromLu'srecordedsayingsasChandoes,andthisisaminordrawbackofthebook. PhilosophyEast&WestVolume61,Number2April2011388­391 ©2011byUniversityofHawai`iPress However,Chan'sselectionfromLu'slettersorotherwritingsamountstoscantyparagraphsorremarksoutofcontext,whileIvanhoeplaceshisselectionsintheiroriginal contextbycoveringamajorpartofeachpiece.Chan'sselectionsfromWangYangming'sworkincludeonlyWang'sInquiry on the Great Learning (Daxuewen) andInstructions for Practical Living (Chuanxilu),whereasIvanhoe'sReadings includesboththesedocuments(whichhetranslatesasQuestions on the Great LearningandA Record for Practice),aswellasadditionalselectionsfromWang'sphilosophicalcorrespondenceandhispoetry.Overall,Ivanhoe'sReadingsgivesamore complete presentation of the two philosophers' philosophical writings than the Source Bookdoes.Onealsogetstoseemoreofthephilosophers'personalitiesfrom thevariouswritingstylesselected. IncomparingIvanhoe'sReadingstotheoriginalChinesetexts,Iwasoftenstruck bytheingeniouschoiceofwordsthatIvanhoemakes.ThechoicesreflectIvanhoe's philosophicalinsightsonthephilosophyatissue.Forexample,onewouldnaturally betemptedtotranslateWangYangming'sphrasebentias"substance"(asChan

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Philosophy East and WestUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Apr 27, 2011

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