Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Reaching One's Own People, Reaching the World

Reaching One's Own People, Reaching the World M A N J U S H R E E T H A P A Modern literature in Nepal is quite recent, dating from well after the start of the twentieth century. The region's literature in traditional forms is, of course, much older, beginning as early as the thirteenth century with epigraphs, devotional poems, folklore and folk ballads, and the translation of texts from Sanskrit, Hindi, Urdu, and other established languages of South Asia. Khasa-bhasa, or "old Nepali," was spoken by the rulers of the principality of Gorkha, and so when the Nepal valley was unified around 1790 by the Gorkha ruler Prithvi Narayan Shah, the new kingdom of Nepal adopted Khasa-bhasa as the dominant language. Today, Nepal is home to at least sixty-one caste and ethnic groups and seventy-one languages, but a modernized version of Khasa-bhasa is the official "Nepali" language, used for governance, education, and commerce. Nepali is also the language in which most of country's literature is written. The founding fi g u r eo f Nepali literature is traditionally held to beBhanubhakta Acharya (1814­1868), who has been canonized, somewhat inaccurately, as the country's aadikabi, or "first poet." Other early writers who played major roles http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Manoa University of Hawai'I Press

Reaching One's Own People, Reaching the World

Manoa , Volume 13 (2) – Oct 1, 2001

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-hawai-i-press/reaching-one-s-own-people-reaching-the-world-6M2XSQlgGs
Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-943x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

M A N J U S H R E E T H A P A Modern literature in Nepal is quite recent, dating from well after the start of the twentieth century. The region's literature in traditional forms is, of course, much older, beginning as early as the thirteenth century with epigraphs, devotional poems, folklore and folk ballads, and the translation of texts from Sanskrit, Hindi, Urdu, and other established languages of South Asia. Khasa-bhasa, or "old Nepali," was spoken by the rulers of the principality of Gorkha, and so when the Nepal valley was unified around 1790 by the Gorkha ruler Prithvi Narayan Shah, the new kingdom of Nepal adopted Khasa-bhasa as the dominant language. Today, Nepal is home to at least sixty-one caste and ethnic groups and seventy-one languages, but a modernized version of Khasa-bhasa is the official "Nepali" language, used for governance, education, and commerce. Nepali is also the language in which most of country's literature is written. The founding fi g u r eo f Nepali literature is traditionally held to beBhanubhakta Acharya (1814­1868), who has been canonized, somewhat inaccurately, as the country's aadikabi, or "first poet." Other early writers who played major roles

Journal

ManoaUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Oct 1, 2001

There are no references for this article.