Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

(Re)imag(in)ing Other 2ness: A Postmortem for the Postmodern in India

(Re)imag(in)ing Other 2ness: A Postmortem for the Postmodern in India richard m. eaton University of Arizona East is East, and West is West, and never the twain shall meet. --R. Kipling, 1889 Colonialism seems to have created much of what is accepted as Indian "tradition." --N. Dirks, 1989 i his essay raises several questions on recent trends in the writing of Indian history. First, how can one account for the appearance of postmodernist thought and postcolonial criticism in Indian historiography? Second, what has been the history of this encounter? And third, how has our understanding of Indian history in the "postcolonial," the "colonial," or the "precolonial" periods been influenced by these perspectives and critiques? The appearance of postmodernist influences in the writing of Indian history is related to the evolution of the highly influential Subaltern Studies movement, launched in Calcutta in 1982. Scholars contributing to early issues of the movement's publication, Subaltern Studies, were collectively concerned with restoring voice and agency to those classes of India's nonelite "subalterns"--peasants, industrial Journal of World History, Vol. 11, No. 1 ©2000 by University of Hawai`i Press journal of world history, spring 2000 workers, women, and tribals, among others--that had been excluded from previous historiographical traditions. The first three issues of Subaltern http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of World History University of Hawai'I Press

(Re)imag(in)ing Other 2ness: A Postmortem for the Postmodern in India

Journal of World History , Volume 11 (1) – Mar 1, 2000

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-hawai-i-press/re-imag-in-ing-other-2ness-a-postmortem-for-the-postmodern-in-india-WeJyvJE5x7
Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 by University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-8050
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

richard m. eaton University of Arizona East is East, and West is West, and never the twain shall meet. --R. Kipling, 1889 Colonialism seems to have created much of what is accepted as Indian "tradition." --N. Dirks, 1989 i his essay raises several questions on recent trends in the writing of Indian history. First, how can one account for the appearance of postmodernist thought and postcolonial criticism in Indian historiography? Second, what has been the history of this encounter? And third, how has our understanding of Indian history in the "postcolonial," the "colonial," or the "precolonial" periods been influenced by these perspectives and critiques? The appearance of postmodernist influences in the writing of Indian history is related to the evolution of the highly influential Subaltern Studies movement, launched in Calcutta in 1982. Scholars contributing to early issues of the movement's publication, Subaltern Studies, were collectively concerned with restoring voice and agency to those classes of India's nonelite "subalterns"--peasants, industrial Journal of World History, Vol. 11, No. 1 ©2000 by University of Hawai`i Press journal of world history, spring 2000 workers, women, and tribals, among others--that had been excluded from previous historiographical traditions. The first three issues of Subaltern

Journal

Journal of World HistoryUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Mar 1, 2000

There are no references for this article.