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Raiding, Trading, and Feasting: The Political Economy of Philippine Chiefdoms (review)

Raiding, Trading, and Feasting: The Political Economy of Philippine Chiefdoms (review) asian perspectives 39(1±2) spring and fall 2000 A holistic researcher might wonder what features gave these languages such an advantage that they should have spread in this way. Is it just because the speakers may have brought falciparum malaria with them ( p. 100)? I doubt it: there is a major problem here for a holistic prehistorian. In the exploration of Remote Oceania, people transported landscapes, including animals and plants, some inadvertent, some intentional. Not all made it to all islands and this was choice as much as chance. How did these choices a¨ect the histories of the di¨erent islands? There isn't too much agency in this book, but such questions could have been looked at within the framework that Kirch has set himself. On a larger scale it could be argued that Kirch's Polynesian inclination itself makes the book a bit more of a statement about the past than the future of Paci®c archaeology. There certainly are still problems in Remote Oceania, perhaps the most important being whether the various expressions of complexity are all simply the result of population growth ( p. 311), environmental di¨erences, and historically accidental trajectories, as he is inclined to believe. But http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Asian Perspectives University of Hawai'I Press

Raiding, Trading, and Feasting: The Political Economy of Philippine Chiefdoms (review)

Asian Perspectives , Volume 39 (1) – Jan 1, 2000

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1535-8283
Publisher site
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Abstract

asian perspectives 39(1±2) spring and fall 2000 A holistic researcher might wonder what features gave these languages such an advantage that they should have spread in this way. Is it just because the speakers may have brought falciparum malaria with them ( p. 100)? I doubt it: there is a major problem here for a holistic prehistorian. In the exploration of Remote Oceania, people transported landscapes, including animals and plants, some inadvertent, some intentional. Not all made it to all islands and this was choice as much as chance. How did these choices a¨ect the histories of the di¨erent islands? There isn't too much agency in this book, but such questions could have been looked at within the framework that Kirch has set himself. On a larger scale it could be argued that Kirch's Polynesian inclination itself makes the book a bit more of a statement about the past than the future of Paci®c archaeology. There certainly are still problems in Remote Oceania, perhaps the most important being whether the various expressions of complexity are all simply the result of population growth ( p. 311), environmental di¨erences, and historically accidental trajectories, as he is inclined to believe. But

Journal

Asian PerspectivesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jan 1, 2000

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