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Queer Marxism in Two Chinas by Petrus Liu (review)

Queer Marxism in Two Chinas by Petrus Liu (review) China Review International: Vol. 21, No. 2, 2014 the way he wanted them to do" (p. 194). Yet those friends helped Ricci to have a better understanding of the three main native spiritual traditions. This is not the first book that deals with Ricci's publications and his friendship with Chinese. Several books have dealt with this subject before. For example, Huang Yinong, Liangtou she: Mingmo qingchu de diyidai tianzhujiaotu (A twoheaded snake: The first generation of Catholic disciples in the Ming-Qing transition) (Xinzhu: Qinghua University Press, 2005), and R. Po-chia Hsia, A Jesuit in the Forbidden City: Matteo Ricci, 1552­1610 (New York: Oxford University Press, 2010). Both books examine Ricci's interactions with his Chinese friends from cultural and philosophical perspectives. Thus, much that is discussed in this book can be found in other writings on the subject. Nonetheless, Liu's literary analysis of Ricci's publications in China provides refreshing ideas for the reader. Its comparison of philosophical, religious, and literary similarities and differences between the West and China undoubtedly enriches our understanding of Ricci's interactions with his Chinese friends. Therefore, this book is a useful addition not only to the study of Christianity in China but also to the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png China Review International University of Hawai'I Press

Queer Marxism in Two Chinas by Petrus Liu (review)

China Review International , Volume 21 (2) – Nov 28, 2014

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Hawai'i Press.
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1527-9367
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Abstract

China Review International: Vol. 21, No. 2, 2014 the way he wanted them to do" (p. 194). Yet those friends helped Ricci to have a better understanding of the three main native spiritual traditions. This is not the first book that deals with Ricci's publications and his friendship with Chinese. Several books have dealt with this subject before. For example, Huang Yinong, Liangtou she: Mingmo qingchu de diyidai tianzhujiaotu (A twoheaded snake: The first generation of Catholic disciples in the Ming-Qing transition) (Xinzhu: Qinghua University Press, 2005), and R. Po-chia Hsia, A Jesuit in the Forbidden City: Matteo Ricci, 1552­1610 (New York: Oxford University Press, 2010). Both books examine Ricci's interactions with his Chinese friends from cultural and philosophical perspectives. Thus, much that is discussed in this book can be found in other writings on the subject. Nonetheless, Liu's literary analysis of Ricci's publications in China provides refreshing ideas for the reader. Its comparison of philosophical, religious, and literary similarities and differences between the West and China undoubtedly enriches our understanding of Ricci's interactions with his Chinese friends. Therefore, this book is a useful addition not only to the study of Christianity in China but also to the

Journal

China Review InternationalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Nov 28, 2014

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