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Qing Travelers to the Far West: Diplomacy and the Information Order in Late Imperial China by Jenny Huangfu Day (review)

Qing Travelers to the Far West: Diplomacy and the Information Order in Late Imperial China by... Reviews 25 in China. This work is path-breaking not only because it is grounded on new data, but also because of its theoretical contributions. While primarily an anthropological study, this work exemplifies an interdisciplinary approach. The author weaves together ethnographic research, historical tradition, Buddhist philosophy, and Geluk institutional practices seamlessly into the narrative. In this process, Caple starts a new discussion on the ethics of monastic revival in Tibetan areas of China. This moral-turn in the study of Tibetan monastics is innovative and important. Given the subject matter, this conversation might be further enrichened by some attention to literature in the growing field of Buddhist ethics, a subfield of which concerns Tibet, found in works by Jonathan Gold, Thupten Jinpa, Sonam Kachru, Jay Garfield, Douglas Duckworth, among others, but is absent from this work. Nonetheless, Jane E. Caple successfully shows how Tibetan monastics and Buddhist lay people wrestle with the parameters of good and bad within the local moral community and make moral decisions that affect monastic development and reform in diverse arenas, such as the economy, conduct, and education. Tibetan monastics negotiate moral boundaries both within the constraints of the Chinese state’s political and social controls and despite http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png China Review International University of Hawai'I Press

Qing Travelers to the Far West: Diplomacy and the Information Order in Late Imperial China by Jenny Huangfu Day (review)

China Review International , Volume 25 (1) – Mar 6, 2020

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9367

Abstract

Reviews 25 in China. This work is path-breaking not only because it is grounded on new data, but also because of its theoretical contributions. While primarily an anthropological study, this work exemplifies an interdisciplinary approach. The author weaves together ethnographic research, historical tradition, Buddhist philosophy, and Geluk institutional practices seamlessly into the narrative. In this process, Caple starts a new discussion on the ethics of monastic revival in Tibetan areas of China. This moral-turn in the study of Tibetan monastics is innovative and important. Given the subject matter, this conversation might be further enrichened by some attention to literature in the growing field of Buddhist ethics, a subfield of which concerns Tibet, found in works by Jonathan Gold, Thupten Jinpa, Sonam Kachru, Jay Garfield, Douglas Duckworth, among others, but is absent from this work. Nonetheless, Jane E. Caple successfully shows how Tibetan monastics and Buddhist lay people wrestle with the parameters of good and bad within the local moral community and make moral decisions that affect monastic development and reform in diverse arenas, such as the economy, conduct, and education. Tibetan monastics negotiate moral boundaries both within the constraints of the Chinese state’s political and social controls and despite

Journal

China Review InternationalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Mar 6, 2020

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