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Publicizing Private Lives in a Rainbow Nation: The Year in South Africa

Publicizing Private Lives in a Rainbow Nation: The Year in South Africa publicizing teapriv lives in a rainbow tionna the year in south africa nick mdika tembo Free speech during the apartheid era was not possible, especially for blacks. M. Neelika Jayawardane noted in her 2013 Symposium Magazine article, ti- tled “Memoirs Take a Daring Turn in South Africa,” that until recently the apartheid state was obsessed with controlling the national narrative, as well as the stories people told, believed, and internalized about themselves and others. It imposed that control using surveillance, legislation, state-mandated violence, and community policing. But since the fall of apartheid in 1994, the world has witnessed a deluge of life writing—biography, autobiography, memoir, and testimony—from South Africa. My review will be limited to a small fraction of these works, specic fi ally those that have appeared in Eng - lish from mid-2016 to September 2017. Some of the notable publications that have appeared during this period are works by Glynnis Breytenbach (Rule of Law), David Coplan and Oscar Gutierrez (Last Night at the Bassline), Piers Cruickshanks (Confluence ), John Fredericks (Skollie), Raq fi ue Gangat ( Bend- ing the Rules), Thandeka Gqubule ( No Longer Whispering to Power), Bridget Hilton-Barber (Student Comrade Prisoner Spy), Daryl Ilbury (Tim http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Biography University of Hawai'I Press

Publicizing Private Lives in a Rainbow Nation: The Year in South Africa

Biography , Volume 40 (4) – Mar 8, 2018

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © Biographical Research Center
ISSN
0162-4962
eISSN
1529-1456

Abstract

publicizing teapriv lives in a rainbow tionna the year in south africa nick mdika tembo Free speech during the apartheid era was not possible, especially for blacks. M. Neelika Jayawardane noted in her 2013 Symposium Magazine article, ti- tled “Memoirs Take a Daring Turn in South Africa,” that until recently the apartheid state was obsessed with controlling the national narrative, as well as the stories people told, believed, and internalized about themselves and others. It imposed that control using surveillance, legislation, state-mandated violence, and community policing. But since the fall of apartheid in 1994, the world has witnessed a deluge of life writing—biography, autobiography, memoir, and testimony—from South Africa. My review will be limited to a small fraction of these works, specic fi ally those that have appeared in Eng - lish from mid-2016 to September 2017. Some of the notable publications that have appeared during this period are works by Glynnis Breytenbach (Rule of Law), David Coplan and Oscar Gutierrez (Last Night at the Bassline), Piers Cruickshanks (Confluence ), John Fredericks (Skollie), Raq fi ue Gangat ( Bend- ing the Rules), Thandeka Gqubule ( No Longer Whispering to Power), Bridget Hilton-Barber (Student Comrade Prisoner Spy), Daryl Ilbury (Tim

Journal

BiographyUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Mar 8, 2018

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