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Proto-Micronesian Kin Terms, Descent Groups, and Interisland Voyaging

Proto-Micronesian Kin Terms, Descent Groups, and Interisland Voyaging , Descent Groups, and Interisland Voyaging1 Per Hage university of utah Jeff Marck university of iowa The historical method of comparative linguistics is used to reconstruct ProtoMicronesian kin terms. Linguistic evidence suggests that Proto-Micronesian society was matrilineal rather than bilateral as Murdock proposed in an early typological reconstruction of Micronesian society. The weakening or disappearance of matrilineal institutions in Micronesia is associated with the demise of regular long-distance voyaging. 1. INTRODUCTION. In a typological approach to culture history, Murdock (1948) argued that Proto-Micronesian society was "Hawaiian" in type, with generation-Hawaiian kinship terminology (parent = parent's same sex sibling, sibling = cousin, child = sibling's child), bilateral kindreds, bilocal residence, and the absence of unilineal descent groups. According to Murdock, matrilineal residence, matrilineal descent, and Crow terminologies (with generational skewing) and Iroquois terminologies (with separate terms for cross-cousins) were later developments. Murdock's reconstruction of Proto-Micronesian society was consistent with his more general reconstruction of Proto­Malayo-Polynesian society as Hawaiian in type. It was accepted by many anthropologists, most notably by Goodenough (1951:95), who wrote: "That the Hawaiian type of kinship system was ancestral not only to the system now found in Truk but to those found throughout Micronesia has been http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Oceanic Linguistics University of Hawai'I Press

Proto-Micronesian Kin Terms, Descent Groups, and Interisland Voyaging

Oceanic Linguistics , Volume 41 (1) – Jun 1, 2002

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University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9421
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Abstract

, Descent Groups, and Interisland Voyaging1 Per Hage university of utah Jeff Marck university of iowa The historical method of comparative linguistics is used to reconstruct ProtoMicronesian kin terms. Linguistic evidence suggests that Proto-Micronesian society was matrilineal rather than bilateral as Murdock proposed in an early typological reconstruction of Micronesian society. The weakening or disappearance of matrilineal institutions in Micronesia is associated with the demise of regular long-distance voyaging. 1. INTRODUCTION. In a typological approach to culture history, Murdock (1948) argued that Proto-Micronesian society was "Hawaiian" in type, with generation-Hawaiian kinship terminology (parent = parent's same sex sibling, sibling = cousin, child = sibling's child), bilateral kindreds, bilocal residence, and the absence of unilineal descent groups. According to Murdock, matrilineal residence, matrilineal descent, and Crow terminologies (with generational skewing) and Iroquois terminologies (with separate terms for cross-cousins) were later developments. Murdock's reconstruction of Proto-Micronesian society was consistent with his more general reconstruction of Proto­Malayo-Polynesian society as Hawaiian in type. It was accepted by many anthropologists, most notably by Goodenough (1951:95), who wrote: "That the Hawaiian type of kinship system was ancestral not only to the system now found in Truk but to those found throughout Micronesia has been

Journal

Oceanic LinguisticsUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jun 1, 2002

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