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Protestantism in Contemporary China (review)

Protestantism in Contemporary China (review) Reviews 133 Alan Hunter and Kim-kwong Chan. Protestantism in Contemporary China. Cambridge Studies in Ideology and Religion. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 1993. xxi, 291 pp. Hardcover $64.95. Alan Hunter and Kim-kwong Chan have written a thoroughly researched and carefully considered account of the Protestant Church in China. Based on official government records, their own research, and interviews with overseas Chinese clergymen and others interested in Chinese Christianity, and writings of Chinese evangelists, clergymen and churchgoers, this book will stand for some time to come as the authoritative work on the subject. Accurate information about Chinese Christianity is hard to obtain, particularly on the "house church movement," which Hunter and Chan prefer to term "the autonomous Christian communities" (p. 81) because many of the "houses" now have church buildings, and there is no "movement" as such. Indeed, the autiiors attribute some of the house churches to the simple fact that few churches exist for Christians to attend and, as die Chris- tians age (many are over eighty), traveling long distances on uncertain, crowded public transportation has become increasingly more difficult. Given such a situation, it is simply easier for members to gather close to home in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png China Review International University of Hawai'I Press

Protestantism in Contemporary China (review)

China Review International , Volume 2 (1) – Mar 30, 1995

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Hawai'I Press
ISSN
1527-9367
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Abstract

Reviews 133 Alan Hunter and Kim-kwong Chan. Protestantism in Contemporary China. Cambridge Studies in Ideology and Religion. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 1993. xxi, 291 pp. Hardcover $64.95. Alan Hunter and Kim-kwong Chan have written a thoroughly researched and carefully considered account of the Protestant Church in China. Based on official government records, their own research, and interviews with overseas Chinese clergymen and others interested in Chinese Christianity, and writings of Chinese evangelists, clergymen and churchgoers, this book will stand for some time to come as the authoritative work on the subject. Accurate information about Chinese Christianity is hard to obtain, particularly on the "house church movement," which Hunter and Chan prefer to term "the autonomous Christian communities" (p. 81) because many of the "houses" now have church buildings, and there is no "movement" as such. Indeed, the autiiors attribute some of the house churches to the simple fact that few churches exist for Christians to attend and, as die Chris- tians age (many are over eighty), traveling long distances on uncertain, crowded public transportation has become increasingly more difficult. Given such a situation, it is simply easier for members to gather close to home in

Journal

China Review InternationalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Mar 30, 1995

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