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Protection of Intellectual, Biological, and Cultural Property in Papua New Guinea (review)

Protection of Intellectual, Biological, and Cultural Property in Papua New Guinea (review) the contemporary pacific · fall 2003 presented in Port Moresby in August 1997 at a seminar on intellectual property rights in biological and cultural materials. The contributors are from a variety of backgrounds: anthropology, biology, pharmacology, archaeology, ethnomusicology, and law. This clearly indicates the scope of the problems addressed. The development of intellectual property laws in Papua New Guinea has received various stimuli throughout the 1990s: Papua New Guinea's signing of the Convention of Biological Diversity in 1992, its adoption of the Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property, and its membership of the World Intellectual Property Organization. The first three chapters focus on the wider context involved in the discussion of intellectual property rights. Busse and Whimp specify the main concepts involved and provide a brief historical overview of English (intellectual) property law. With England and Australia as primary colonial influences in Papua New Guinea, this choice for historical background is logical, although it is more usual to look at United States law as a context for debate. Harroun presents a useful overview of existing approaches to intellectual property rights and the rationale behind their use. Strathern provides a perspective on intellectual property in Papua New Guinea http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

Protection of Intellectual, Biological, and Cultural Property in Papua New Guinea (review)

The Contemporary Pacific , Volume 15 (2) – Aug 7, 2003

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9464
Publisher site
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Abstract

the contemporary pacific · fall 2003 presented in Port Moresby in August 1997 at a seminar on intellectual property rights in biological and cultural materials. The contributors are from a variety of backgrounds: anthropology, biology, pharmacology, archaeology, ethnomusicology, and law. This clearly indicates the scope of the problems addressed. The development of intellectual property laws in Papua New Guinea has received various stimuli throughout the 1990s: Papua New Guinea's signing of the Convention of Biological Diversity in 1992, its adoption of the Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property, and its membership of the World Intellectual Property Organization. The first three chapters focus on the wider context involved in the discussion of intellectual property rights. Busse and Whimp specify the main concepts involved and provide a brief historical overview of English (intellectual) property law. With England and Australia as primary colonial influences in Papua New Guinea, this choice for historical background is logical, although it is more usual to look at United States law as a context for debate. Harroun presents a useful overview of existing approaches to intellectual property rights and the rationale behind their use. Strathern provides a perspective on intellectual property in Papua New Guinea

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Aug 7, 2003

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