Prolegomena to a Comparative Reading of The Major Life of St. Francis and The Life of Milarepa

Prolegomena to a Comparative Reading of The Major Life of St. Francis and The Life of Milarepa Massimo A. Rondolino Carroll University Different religious traditions in different cultures have recorded and transmitted the lives of individuals recognized as "perfected." The particular doctrinal framework within which each of such figures is identified as "perfected" is certainly specific to the religious tradition that tells their life stories. Similarly, the social processes by which these religious life writings are written, received, and circulated are appropriate to the historical and geographical contexts of their composition. Yet, narrative parallels can be detected across traditions, and the question arises whether these apparent similarities in the creation of such religious life stories across cultures, space, and time reflect actually similar doctrinal and political agendas. Could there be an underlying hagiographic process common to all these literary traditions, regardless of their compositional contexts? In other words, is the writing of spiritual lives a phenomenon that is contextual to a specific religious tradition, or is it rather a particular human response to given social and historical circumstances? I want to offer here a preliminary assessment of a study in comparative hagiology. To this end, I focus on two specific narrative traditions that pertain to two distinct religious, historical, and geographical contexts: the hagiographic writings http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Buddhist-Christian Studies University of Hawai'I Press

Prolegomena to a Comparative Reading of The Major Life of St. Francis and The Life of Milarepa

Buddhist-Christian Studies, Volume 35 (1) – Dec 16, 2015

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9472
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Abstract

Massimo A. Rondolino Carroll University Different religious traditions in different cultures have recorded and transmitted the lives of individuals recognized as "perfected." The particular doctrinal framework within which each of such figures is identified as "perfected" is certainly specific to the religious tradition that tells their life stories. Similarly, the social processes by which these religious life writings are written, received, and circulated are appropriate to the historical and geographical contexts of their composition. Yet, narrative parallels can be detected across traditions, and the question arises whether these apparent similarities in the creation of such religious life stories across cultures, space, and time reflect actually similar doctrinal and political agendas. Could there be an underlying hagiographic process common to all these literary traditions, regardless of their compositional contexts? In other words, is the writing of spiritual lives a phenomenon that is contextual to a specific religious tradition, or is it rather a particular human response to given social and historical circumstances? I want to offer here a preliminary assessment of a study in comparative hagiology. To this end, I focus on two specific narrative traditions that pertain to two distinct religious, historical, and geographical contexts: the hagiographic writings

Journal

Buddhist-Christian StudiesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Dec 16, 2015

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