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Primary Colors

Primary Colors 2ATJ_223-291 6/1/06 11:37 AM Page 223 pl ay Primary Colors: A Play by Mishima Yukio Introduction and Translation by Christopher L. Pearce Primary Colors (Sangenshoku) is a 1955 play by Mishima Yukio that brings up issues of homosexuality and bisexuality. Its positive treatment of homosexual themes contrasts with the darkness of Forbidden Colors, the author’s novel of the same period. While the play has received only a few professional productions, its poetry and theme help us understand Mishima’s developing aesthetic. Christopher Pearce is a J ET Programme participant currently working as a Coordi- nator for International Relations for the government of Hyogo prefecture in Japan. He holds a bachelor’s degree in the Japanese language from Portland State University. This translation is printed with the generous permission of the Estate of Mishima Yukio. Introduction: Mishima the Dramatist Mishima Yukio (1925–1970) will surely be remembered as the most infamous Japanese author of the twentieth century owing to his failed insurrection and subsequent suicide. In spite of his premature death at the age of forty-five, Mishima left behind a body of work that can scarcely be matched by any author in any language. Mishima’s most recent complete works, Ketteiban Mishima Yukio Zenshü http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Asian Theatre Journal University of Hawai'I Press

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 The University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-2109

Abstract

2ATJ_223-291 6/1/06 11:37 AM Page 223 pl ay Primary Colors: A Play by Mishima Yukio Introduction and Translation by Christopher L. Pearce Primary Colors (Sangenshoku) is a 1955 play by Mishima Yukio that brings up issues of homosexuality and bisexuality. Its positive treatment of homosexual themes contrasts with the darkness of Forbidden Colors, the author’s novel of the same period. While the play has received only a few professional productions, its poetry and theme help us understand Mishima’s developing aesthetic. Christopher Pearce is a J ET Programme participant currently working as a Coordi- nator for International Relations for the government of Hyogo prefecture in Japan. He holds a bachelor’s degree in the Japanese language from Portland State University. This translation is printed with the generous permission of the Estate of Mishima Yukio. Introduction: Mishima the Dramatist Mishima Yukio (1925–1970) will surely be remembered as the most infamous Japanese author of the twentieth century owing to his failed insurrection and subsequent suicide. In spite of his premature death at the age of forty-five, Mishima left behind a body of work that can scarcely be matched by any author in any language. Mishima’s most recent complete works, Ketteiban Mishima Yukio Zenshü

Journal

Asian Theatre JournalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Aug 17, 2006

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