Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Prehistory of the Chitrakot Falls, Central India (review)

Prehistory of the Chitrakot Falls, Central India (review) asian perspectives 39(1±2) spring and fall 2000 Archaeology of the Japanese Islands.'' The chapter gives a good overview of the main classi®catory and culture-historical issues relating to the Japanese language, and lays out Hudson's view of how Japanese, introduced from Korea at the beginning of the Yayoi period, replaced the language previously spoken there. He endorses the solid linguistic evidence that Japanese and Korean are related languages, both members of a Northeast Asian family that also includes Manchu and Tungusic. Hudson also acknowledges the sentiment among linguists that modern Korean and modern Japanese are so di¨erent they could scarcely have diverged so far from a shared mother tongue in only 2,000 years. He ``solves'' this problem by suggesting that Japanese may be derived from an Old Koguryo language spoken in northern Korea and Manchuria, which may have been closer to Old Japanese than was the language of Silla in south Korea, from which modern Korean is most directly derivable. The weakness of this tortuous and speculative proposal is manifest. Surely the theory o¨ered years ago by distinguished linguist Roy Andrew Miller, that the language ancestral to modern Japanese crossed between Korea and Kyushu during Early Jomon times, and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Asian Perspectives University of Hawai'I Press

Prehistory of the Chitrakot Falls, Central India (review)

Asian Perspectives , Volume 39 (1) – Jan 1, 2000

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-hawai-i-press/prehistory-of-the-chitrakot-falls-central-india-review-nVR4Cy6OyG
Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1535-8283
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

asian perspectives 39(1±2) spring and fall 2000 Archaeology of the Japanese Islands.'' The chapter gives a good overview of the main classi®catory and culture-historical issues relating to the Japanese language, and lays out Hudson's view of how Japanese, introduced from Korea at the beginning of the Yayoi period, replaced the language previously spoken there. He endorses the solid linguistic evidence that Japanese and Korean are related languages, both members of a Northeast Asian family that also includes Manchu and Tungusic. Hudson also acknowledges the sentiment among linguists that modern Korean and modern Japanese are so di¨erent they could scarcely have diverged so far from a shared mother tongue in only 2,000 years. He ``solves'' this problem by suggesting that Japanese may be derived from an Old Koguryo language spoken in northern Korea and Manchuria, which may have been closer to Old Japanese than was the language of Silla in south Korea, from which modern Korean is most directly derivable. The weakness of this tortuous and speculative proposal is manifest. Surely the theory o¨ered years ago by distinguished linguist Roy Andrew Miller, that the language ancestral to modern Japanese crossed between Korea and Kyushu during Early Jomon times, and

Journal

Asian PerspectivesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jan 1, 2000

There are no references for this article.