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Power and Taboo: Sacred Objects from the Eastern Pacific, and: Pasifika Styles, and: Pacific Encounters: Art and Divinity in Polynesia (review)

Power and Taboo: Sacred Objects from the Eastern Pacific, and: Pasifika Styles, and: Pacific... book and media reviews ing the exhibition research, addresses some of these contemporary issues in an essay in the beautifully illustrated exhibit catalog. Haraha wrote his comments before the public challenge to the provenance of certain objects on display in the Jolika Collection of the de Young Museum in San Francisco (see review, TCP 19:345­351), and the arduous endorsement of contemporary collectors by official representatives of the Government of Papua New Guinea in April 2006, expressed in a letter from the Embassy of Papua New Guinea to the de Young Museum director and reported in the online edition of Nature (44 [6]: 722­723). Haraha emphasizes that the pieces in this collection were primarily gathered in museum-sponsored field trips or through enforcement of the National Cultural Property (Preservation) Act, which prevents export of older objects of cultural significance. He describes how the PNG National Museum is viewed locally as a contemporary Haus Tumbuna, or longhouse, storing ancestral knowledge in the form of artifacts within a new environment of knowledge preservation and production in object form. The history of movement and collecting embodied in these objects and photographs is inevitably entangled in complex networks of colonialism, as Virginia Lee Webb http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

Power and Taboo: Sacred Objects from the Eastern Pacific, and: Pasifika Styles, and: Pacific Encounters: Art and Divinity in Polynesia (review)

The Contemporary Pacific , Volume 20 (1) – Feb 11, 2007

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 University of Hawai'i Press. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1527-9464
Publisher site
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Abstract

book and media reviews ing the exhibition research, addresses some of these contemporary issues in an essay in the beautifully illustrated exhibit catalog. Haraha wrote his comments before the public challenge to the provenance of certain objects on display in the Jolika Collection of the de Young Museum in San Francisco (see review, TCP 19:345­351), and the arduous endorsement of contemporary collectors by official representatives of the Government of Papua New Guinea in April 2006, expressed in a letter from the Embassy of Papua New Guinea to the de Young Museum director and reported in the online edition of Nature (44 [6]: 722­723). Haraha emphasizes that the pieces in this collection were primarily gathered in museum-sponsored field trips or through enforcement of the National Cultural Property (Preservation) Act, which prevents export of older objects of cultural significance. He describes how the PNG National Museum is viewed locally as a contemporary Haus Tumbuna, or longhouse, storing ancestral knowledge in the form of artifacts within a new environment of knowledge preservation and production in object form. The history of movement and collecting embodied in these objects and photographs is inevitably entangled in complex networks of colonialism, as Virginia Lee Webb

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Feb 11, 2007

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