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Postcolonial Pacific Writing: Representations of the Body (review)

Postcolonial Pacific Writing: Representations of the Body (review) book and media reviews in a hunting society, is the hunting of game. . . . The Puyuma hunted any game the mountain provided, and, more specifically, in a ritual context, monkeys and deer. It was forbidden to keep game for oneself; it had to be passed on. However, in a farming society, individuals possessed private property, which could be handed down, and which became a source of covetousness and theft. The brothers discovered shame with Takio, the rice cake thief. . . . The group has passed from an activity based mainly on hunting, gardening, and gathering, to another based on farming. In the former society, men were hunters, and it was they who exercised the functions of shamans. . . . Men took the game from nature, but they knew that their catch depended on the biruas' [spiritual beings] goodwill, and they had to `give them their share'" (188­189). The rite of the deer and the ritual "feeding Takio or his mountain" (189), Cauquelin argues convincingly, are part of the same quest: fertility. Chapter 8 is appropriately illustrated to deal with material civilization, and a short, last chapter, as previously indicated, takes stock of the present http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

Postcolonial Pacific Writing: Representations of the Body (review)

The Contemporary Pacific , Volume 18 (2) – Jul 27, 2006

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9464
Publisher site
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Abstract

book and media reviews in a hunting society, is the hunting of game. . . . The Puyuma hunted any game the mountain provided, and, more specifically, in a ritual context, monkeys and deer. It was forbidden to keep game for oneself; it had to be passed on. However, in a farming society, individuals possessed private property, which could be handed down, and which became a source of covetousness and theft. The brothers discovered shame with Takio, the rice cake thief. . . . The group has passed from an activity based mainly on hunting, gardening, and gathering, to another based on farming. In the former society, men were hunters, and it was they who exercised the functions of shamans. . . . Men took the game from nature, but they knew that their catch depended on the biruas' [spiritual beings] goodwill, and they had to `give them their share'" (188­189). The rite of the deer and the ritual "feeding Takio or his mountain" (189), Cauquelin argues convincingly, are part of the same quest: fertility. Chapter 8 is appropriately illustrated to deal with material civilization, and a short, last chapter, as previously indicated, takes stock of the present

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jul 27, 2006

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