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Portuguese Oceanic Expansion, 1400–1800 (review)

Portuguese Oceanic Expansion, 1400–1800 (review) journal of world history, september 2009 Finally, in the contemporary world, genocide seems to be a by-product less of imperialism and colonialism than of ethnic nationalism and the global spread of the nation state. Indeed, some of the worst instances of genocide as in Nigeria, Cambodia, Rwanda, Sudan, and the Congo have occurred not when these areas were under colonial rule, but when they were supposedly liberated by nationalist movements. Such movements often privileged one ethnic group over another in a culturally plural context, leading to ethnic conflict and genocide. Thus it has not been imperialism as such that has led to instances of contemporary genocide, but its opponents. In some noted instances nationalist movements that had been opposed to colonialism and imperialism once in power turned against their own people and committed genocide. In summary, this is a book that proposes a daring thesis, namely that genocide since antiquity has its origins in imperialism and colonialism. Indeed, many genocides can be traced directly to such causes, but some important instances cannot. It would seem that genocide, like murder, occurs in many contexts for many reasons, and these need to be investigated from a comparative historical perspective before http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of World History University of Hawai'I Press

Portuguese Oceanic Expansion, 1400–1800 (review)

Journal of World History , Volume 20 (3) – Sep 6, 2009

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Hawai'I Press
ISSN
1527-8050
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Abstract

journal of world history, september 2009 Finally, in the contemporary world, genocide seems to be a by-product less of imperialism and colonialism than of ethnic nationalism and the global spread of the nation state. Indeed, some of the worst instances of genocide as in Nigeria, Cambodia, Rwanda, Sudan, and the Congo have occurred not when these areas were under colonial rule, but when they were supposedly liberated by nationalist movements. Such movements often privileged one ethnic group over another in a culturally plural context, leading to ethnic conflict and genocide. Thus it has not been imperialism as such that has led to instances of contemporary genocide, but its opponents. In some noted instances nationalist movements that had been opposed to colonialism and imperialism once in power turned against their own people and committed genocide. In summary, this is a book that proposes a daring thesis, namely that genocide since antiquity has its origins in imperialism and colonialism. Indeed, many genocides can be traced directly to such causes, but some important instances cannot. It would seem that genocide, like murder, occurs in many contexts for many reasons, and these need to be investigated from a comparative historical perspective before

Journal

Journal of World HistoryUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Sep 6, 2009

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