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Political Realism, Freedom, and Priority of the Good: Response to Chan, Huang, and Pang-White

Political Realism, Freedom, and Priority of the Good: Response to Chan, Huang, and Pang-White Political Realism, Freedom, and Priority of the Good: Response to Chan, Huang, and Pang-White Jiwei Ci Department of Philosophy, University of Hong Kong jiweici@hku.hk I am extremely grateful to the three commentators for their instructive and challeng- ing criticisms and for giving me the opportunity to make my position more plausi- ble and, where it is bound to remain controversial, clearer than it is in my book. In doing so, I will sometimes be concerned simply to clear up what I consider to be misunderstandings on the part of my commentators, in full awareness that my own lack of clarity or emphasis may well have contributed to them. This I take to be worthwhile in its own right, but especially for the sake of locating more precisely the issues where real disagreement exists and facilitating useful engagement on these issues. As the line between these tasks is seldom sharp, clarification often merging imperceptibly into substantive engagement, I will for the most part not attempt to keep an arbitrary separation between them. Thinking about China with Political Realism I must begin by emphasizing the unusual degree of realism that informs most of the normative discussion in the book. In this http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Philosophy East and West University of Hawai'I Press

Political Realism, Freedom, and Priority of the Good: Response to Chan, Huang, and Pang-White

Philosophy East and West , Volume 68 (2) – Apr 10, 2018

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1529-1898

Abstract

Political Realism, Freedom, and Priority of the Good: Response to Chan, Huang, and Pang-White Jiwei Ci Department of Philosophy, University of Hong Kong jiweici@hku.hk I am extremely grateful to the three commentators for their instructive and challeng- ing criticisms and for giving me the opportunity to make my position more plausi- ble and, where it is bound to remain controversial, clearer than it is in my book. In doing so, I will sometimes be concerned simply to clear up what I consider to be misunderstandings on the part of my commentators, in full awareness that my own lack of clarity or emphasis may well have contributed to them. This I take to be worthwhile in its own right, but especially for the sake of locating more precisely the issues where real disagreement exists and facilitating useful engagement on these issues. As the line between these tasks is seldom sharp, clarification often merging imperceptibly into substantive engagement, I will for the most part not attempt to keep an arbitrary separation between them. Thinking about China with Political Realism I must begin by emphasizing the unusual degree of realism that informs most of the normative discussion in the book. In this

Journal

Philosophy East and WestUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Apr 10, 2018

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