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Political Parties in the Pacific Islands (review)

Political Parties in the Pacific Islands (review) the contemporary pacific · 19:2 (2007) party arrangements--it is, as most demonstrate, too much in every case to talk of party "systems"--within familiar and accepted parameters of the political science literature. This permits comparisons to be made not only between one Pacific entity's party system and the next but also, of course, between Pacific parties and developments as they have evolved elsewhere--in Western countries, but also in Africa, Asia, and in other island communities (in the Caribbean, for instance). While the title of the book suggests a panoramic coverage of "the Pacific Islands," as is often the case with such ambitions the final product is somewhat less comprehensive. For the most part, the focus is largely on Melanesia, no doubt reflecting, at least in part, the publication's Australian origins. The very useful case studies, in which historical perspectives supplement contemporary assessments, review the origins and functions of political parties in Timor-Leste (formerly East Timor), Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands, Vanuatu, New Caledonia, and Fiji, with the closing chapter on Sämoa perhaps allowing the editor, with his publishers, greater scope for deploying "the Pacific Islands" in the title. An additional three chapters introduce the book, one (by the editor) http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

Political Parties in the Pacific Islands (review)

The Contemporary Pacific , Volume 19 (2) – Aug 13, 2007

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 University of Hawai'i Press. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1527-9464
Publisher site
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Abstract

the contemporary pacific · 19:2 (2007) party arrangements--it is, as most demonstrate, too much in every case to talk of party "systems"--within familiar and accepted parameters of the political science literature. This permits comparisons to be made not only between one Pacific entity's party system and the next but also, of course, between Pacific parties and developments as they have evolved elsewhere--in Western countries, but also in Africa, Asia, and in other island communities (in the Caribbean, for instance). While the title of the book suggests a panoramic coverage of "the Pacific Islands," as is often the case with such ambitions the final product is somewhat less comprehensive. For the most part, the focus is largely on Melanesia, no doubt reflecting, at least in part, the publication's Australian origins. The very useful case studies, in which historical perspectives supplement contemporary assessments, review the origins and functions of political parties in Timor-Leste (formerly East Timor), Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands, Vanuatu, New Caledonia, and Fiji, with the closing chapter on Sämoa perhaps allowing the editor, with his publishers, greater scope for deploying "the Pacific Islands" in the title. An additional three chapters introduce the book, one (by the editor)

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Aug 13, 2007

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