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Political Authority: The Two Wheels of the Dharma

Political Authority: The Two Wheels of the Dharma Political Authority The Two Wheels of the Dharma Whalen Lai University of California, USA "The twin wheels of the dharma The two wings of the dove" The twin wheels of the dharma, one of power and the other of righteousness, is the classic metaphor in the Buddhist view of the state and the sagha. We will first register the distinction of that metaphor by going back to its historical roots, showing how and why it is more meaningful for Buddhists than for Hindus. Then we will map its structural growth sociologically, weigh its overall strengths and weaknesses, and consider other Buddhist options for civil order and interstate relationships. Finally we will examine the price of modernity and the crisis of authority that Buddhist culture faces. toward a genealogy of the twin wheels The legend of the Buddha is by now well known. Prince Siddhrtha left family and home, and renounced the kingdom and the world. He had seen the inevitability of suffering. He vowed to find its cause to eliminate that result. After his enlightenment, he reflected upon releasing that path to the world. When the Buddha so taught the Four Noble Truths and the Noble Eightfold Path http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Buddhist-Christian Studies University of Hawai'I Press

Political Authority: The Two Wheels of the Dharma

Buddhist-Christian Studies , Volume 30 (1) – Sep 30, 2010

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Hawai'I Press
ISSN
1527-9472
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Abstract

Political Authority The Two Wheels of the Dharma Whalen Lai University of California, USA "The twin wheels of the dharma The two wings of the dove" The twin wheels of the dharma, one of power and the other of righteousness, is the classic metaphor in the Buddhist view of the state and the sagha. We will first register the distinction of that metaphor by going back to its historical roots, showing how and why it is more meaningful for Buddhists than for Hindus. Then we will map its structural growth sociologically, weigh its overall strengths and weaknesses, and consider other Buddhist options for civil order and interstate relationships. Finally we will examine the price of modernity and the crisis of authority that Buddhist culture faces. toward a genealogy of the twin wheels The legend of the Buddha is by now well known. Prince Siddhrtha left family and home, and renounced the kingdom and the world. He had seen the inevitability of suffering. He vowed to find its cause to eliminate that result. After his enlightenment, he reflected upon releasing that path to the world. When the Buddha so taught the Four Noble Truths and the Noble Eightfold Path

Journal

Buddhist-Christian StudiesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Sep 30, 2010

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