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Poetics, Plays, and Performance: The Politics of Modern Indian Theatre (review)

Poetics, Plays, and Performance: The Politics of Modern Indian Theatre (review) ing to Levith, despite the censorship, Shakespeare was still read and translated but never performed. Levith goes on to discuss the rebirth of Shakespeare in the PRC, which, according to him, happened essentially because of the celebration of Zhu's Complete Works of Shakespeare. This publication sparked revitalization in Shakespeare production, which led to the first Chinese Shakespeare Festival in 1986. The small section pertaining to the first Shakespeare festival in China is riveting. Levith's overview tells of more than seventy productions from 10­ 23 April 1986, which were attended by more than 100,000 people. By far, this is the most exciting part of Levith's book. I was fascinating by all the different styles and concepts of the plays. Some of the performances mixed traditional Chinese opera with Shakespeare, such as the production of Macbeth, which took on the name Bloody Hands. This rearranged production, cut to only eight scenes, included Chinese dance, song, and martial arts. Other productions presented a more traditional version of the plays by setting them in Elizabethan England (The Merchant of Venice) or a Romanesque setting (Anthony and Cleopatra). More depth about each of the productions including more discussion of design and reception would http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Asian Theatre Journal University of Hawai'I Press

Poetics, Plays, and Performance: The Politics of Modern Indian Theatre (review)

Asian Theatre Journal , Volume 25 (1) – Mar 4, 2007

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The University of Hawai'i Press. All rights reserved.
ISSN
1527-2109
Publisher site
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Abstract

ing to Levith, despite the censorship, Shakespeare was still read and translated but never performed. Levith goes on to discuss the rebirth of Shakespeare in the PRC, which, according to him, happened essentially because of the celebration of Zhu's Complete Works of Shakespeare. This publication sparked revitalization in Shakespeare production, which led to the first Chinese Shakespeare Festival in 1986. The small section pertaining to the first Shakespeare festival in China is riveting. Levith's overview tells of more than seventy productions from 10­ 23 April 1986, which were attended by more than 100,000 people. By far, this is the most exciting part of Levith's book. I was fascinating by all the different styles and concepts of the plays. Some of the performances mixed traditional Chinese opera with Shakespeare, such as the production of Macbeth, which took on the name Bloody Hands. This rearranged production, cut to only eight scenes, included Chinese dance, song, and martial arts. Other productions presented a more traditional version of the plays by setting them in Elizabethan England (The Merchant of Venice) or a Romanesque setting (Anthony and Cleopatra). More depth about each of the productions including more discussion of design and reception would

Journal

Asian Theatre JournalUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Mar 4, 2007

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