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Pneumatology and the Christian-Buddhist Dialogue: Does the Spirit Blow Through the Middle Way? by Amos Yong (review)

Pneumatology and the Christian-Buddhist Dialogue: Does the Spirit Blow Through the Middle Way? by... BOOK REVIEWS marily cosmology and evolution) and world religions (primarily Buddhism). These chapters are strongly shaped by process philosophy and process theologies, which form the theological lens Ingram brings to his conversations with science and religions. In the process, he manages to reflect (albeit briefly) on most of the classical theological loci of the Christian traditions: grace, sin, atonement, redemption, anthropology, revelation, sacrifice, resurrection, and so on. Liberation theologies provide a significant secondary theological position from which Ingram engages these topics. For me, reading this book was like taking part in an engaging, ongoing salon at a well-designed home. The setting contains a (sometimes transgressive) mix of colors, textures, styles, and voices, drawing from widely divergent historical periods, cultural origins, and palettes. As host, Ingram is a wise friend and mentor who curates a fascinating collection of people. They come and go, and you never know who might show up or what they might say, but they are passionate and have clear positions on what's being discussed. The mix is always interesting--especially when you don't agree with what's being said!--and sometimes frustrating. In the end I learned less than expected from this book, but I was engaged, met http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Buddhist-Christian Studies University of Hawai'I Press

Pneumatology and the Christian-Buddhist Dialogue: Does the Spirit Blow Through the Middle Way? by Amos Yong (review)

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 The University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9472
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

BOOK REVIEWS marily cosmology and evolution) and world religions (primarily Buddhism). These chapters are strongly shaped by process philosophy and process theologies, which form the theological lens Ingram brings to his conversations with science and religions. In the process, he manages to reflect (albeit briefly) on most of the classical theological loci of the Christian traditions: grace, sin, atonement, redemption, anthropology, revelation, sacrifice, resurrection, and so on. Liberation theologies provide a significant secondary theological position from which Ingram engages these topics. For me, reading this book was like taking part in an engaging, ongoing salon at a well-designed home. The setting contains a (sometimes transgressive) mix of colors, textures, styles, and voices, drawing from widely divergent historical periods, cultural origins, and palettes. As host, Ingram is a wise friend and mentor who curates a fascinating collection of people. They come and go, and you never know who might show up or what they might say, but they are passionate and have clear positions on what's being discussed. The mix is always interesting--especially when you don't agree with what's being said!--and sometimes frustrating. In the end I learned less than expected from this book, but I was engaged, met

Journal

Buddhist-Christian StudiesUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Feb 3, 2014

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