Pluractionality in Ranmo

Pluractionality in Ranmo Abstract: This paper investigates pluractionality in Ranmo, an understudied, underdocumented Papuan (non-Austronesian) language spoken in southwest Papua New Guinea. Based on original fieldwork, this paper brings novel data to bear on the issue of how we delimit the term “pluractional.” It has been frequently observed that pluractional verbs denote not just plural events, but also carry the implication of ‘many’; however, the relationship between “plurality” and “multiplicity” has not been sufficiently explored in the literature. Ranmo has much to contribute in this area because the two notions correspond to two morphologically distinguishable phenomena: root alternation and - an -suffixation. Based on their interaction, I propose that pluractional predicates involve two semantically distinct components, namely, PL (plural) and DEG (degree) meaning ‘a lot’; the latter contributes the ‘many’ reading. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Oceanic Linguistics University of Hawai'I Press

Pluractionality in Ranmo

Oceanic Linguistics, Volume 55 (1) – May 26, 2016

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Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9421
Publisher site
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Abstract

Abstract: This paper investigates pluractionality in Ranmo, an understudied, underdocumented Papuan (non-Austronesian) language spoken in southwest Papua New Guinea. Based on original fieldwork, this paper brings novel data to bear on the issue of how we delimit the term “pluractional.” It has been frequently observed that pluractional verbs denote not just plural events, but also carry the implication of ‘many’; however, the relationship between “plurality” and “multiplicity” has not been sufficiently explored in the literature. Ranmo has much to contribute in this area because the two notions correspond to two morphologically distinguishable phenomena: root alternation and - an -suffixation. Based on their interaction, I propose that pluractional predicates involve two semantically distinct components, namely, PL (plural) and DEG (degree) meaning ‘a lot’; the latter contributes the ‘many’ reading.

Journal

Oceanic LinguisticsUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: May 26, 2016

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