Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Plastic Paradise: The Great Pacific Garbage Patch (review)

Plastic Paradise: The Great Pacific Garbage Patch (review) the contemporary pacific · 28:1 (2016) to see firsthand what she considers "ground zero," an island with minimal human development and an enormous albatross breeding ground awash in plastic debris. According to the filmmaker, plastic debris collects in this fashion because a combination of gyres (large systems of rotating ocean currents) serve as catchment basins, and debris that would otherwise circulate randomly concentrates within certain zones. At the same time, low-lying islets and high islands alike act as "combs" and catch the plastic waste as it swirls by, concentrating the pollutants and toxins with potentially horrific short- and long-term consequences for nonhuman (and possibly human) ecologies. The gyres that participate in the ocean's plastic sickness can be seen as a metaphor for Sun's documentary storytelling. She too has several topical gyres of information that swirl about throughout the film and ultimately coalesce into a compelling picture of environmental dysfunction. Gyre 1: plastic debris. Sun cites statistics for plastic production, which began in the early twentieth century but ramped up during World War II and has seen steady growth since. There is ample footage of debris on Midway (five tons of washed-up plastic is inadvertently fed to nesting albatross http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Contemporary Pacific University of Hawai'I Press

Plastic Paradise: The Great Pacific Garbage Patch (review)

The Contemporary Pacific , Volume 28 (1) – Jan 7, 2016

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-hawai-i-press/plastic-paradise-the-great-pacific-garbage-patch-review-hTXTB01LVR
Publisher
University of Hawai'I Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 University of Hawai'i Press.
ISSN
1527-9464
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

the contemporary pacific · 28:1 (2016) to see firsthand what she considers "ground zero," an island with minimal human development and an enormous albatross breeding ground awash in plastic debris. According to the filmmaker, plastic debris collects in this fashion because a combination of gyres (large systems of rotating ocean currents) serve as catchment basins, and debris that would otherwise circulate randomly concentrates within certain zones. At the same time, low-lying islets and high islands alike act as "combs" and catch the plastic waste as it swirls by, concentrating the pollutants and toxins with potentially horrific short- and long-term consequences for nonhuman (and possibly human) ecologies. The gyres that participate in the ocean's plastic sickness can be seen as a metaphor for Sun's documentary storytelling. She too has several topical gyres of information that swirl about throughout the film and ultimately coalesce into a compelling picture of environmental dysfunction. Gyre 1: plastic debris. Sun cites statistics for plastic production, which began in the early twentieth century but ramped up during World War II and has seen steady growth since. There is ample footage of debris on Midway (five tons of washed-up plastic is inadvertently fed to nesting albatross

Journal

The Contemporary PacificUniversity of Hawai'I Press

Published: Jan 7, 2016

There are no references for this article.